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Monthly Archives: July 2013

The Evolution of Planets

Nebular Hypothesis -- the theory of how our solar system evolved. (Image from Google Images)

Nebular Hypothesis — the theory of how our solar system evolved.
(Image from Google Images)

What the figure at the right expresses is the most popular theory of the formation of solar systems, i.e. how they evolved. It is known as the Nebular Hypothesis.Several billion years after the Big Bang was supposed to have occurred, gaseous clouds cooled enough for stars and then planets to form. The theory, first postulated near the end of the 19th century but rejected in the early 20th century over specific problems with the hypothesis concerning the Law of Angular Momentum, was again embraced after undergoing some changes to address the problems scientists had with it. Nevertheless, problems with the theory continue to arise. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 31, 2013 in The Big Bang, theory of evolution

 

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Chemical Evolution

Periodic Table of the Elements (Image from Google Images)

Periodic Table of the Elements
(Image from Google Images)

If the Big Bang Theory is true, then there must have been a time when hydrogen and helium evolved into oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and the other heavier elements we find on Earth and elsewhere. They had to have come from somewhere, and they are not accounted for in the Big Bang itself. Therefore, they had to have evolved from the most basic elements: hydrogen, helium, deuterium and lithium. Is there an explanation? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 29, 2013 in God, naturalism, theory of evolution

 

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Dark Matter and Dark Energy?

One of the biggest problems of the Big Bang theory is that it needs too many theoretical issues to permit wiggle room to account for its discrepancies. In my previous blog I attempted to show how the arms of a spiral galaxy would collapse in an old universe after only a few turns. Since according to the naturalists’ point of view, the Milky Way galaxy (and every other galaxy) is billions of years old, our sun should have orbited our galactic center at least 20 times. Yet, even if our solar system orbited our galactic center only 4 or 5 times, the spiral arms of the Milky Way would no longer be visible. Yet, they are! Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2013 in Big Bang Theory, naturalism, science

 

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The Big Bang and Spiral Galaxies

Spiral galaxy, NGC 1232, obtained on September 21, 1998. (Image from Google Images)

Spiral galaxy, NGC 1232, obtained on September 21, 1998.
(Image from Google Images)

According to the Big Bang Theory the universe was much smaller some 10 billion years ago. Scientists have known for decades that the universe is expanding and the galaxies are moving away from us. It has been observed by the Hubble Telescope that the further away galaxies are from our Milky Way that the speed at which those galaxies travel away from us increases. Moreover, it seems that all the observable galaxies, no matter how distant, are spiral galaxies, just like our own Milky Way, but this shouldn’t be so, if the universe is billions of years old.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 25, 2013 in Big Bang Theory, naturalism

 

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The Big Bang and Supernovas

The Crab Nebula, shown here as it is today, is the remnant of a supernova which was seen in the year 1054 AD and remained visible to the naked eye for about a year.  (Credit: NASA)

The Crab Nebula, shown here as it is today, is the remnant of a supernova which was seen in the year 1054 AD and remained visible to the naked eye for about a year.
(Credit: NASA)

When a star explodes, it leaves an expanding cloud of residue called a SuperNova Remnant (SNR). The Crab Nebula in the constellation of Taurus and shown in the photo to the left is a good example of a supernova. When it became visible to Earth, the supernova could be seen in the daytime in 1054 for a number of weeks. For galaxies like our own Milky Way every 25-30 years, on average, a star should blow up creating a nova—big stars create supernovas. One must ask how far out does the cloud of the Crab Nebula reach and how long did it take for the cloud to reach the limits we see today? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 23, 2013 in Big Bang Theory, naturalism

 

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The Big Bang

The Big Bang Theory (Image from Google Images)

The Big Bang Theory
(Image from Google Images)

The Big Bang Theory is currently considered to be the best explanation for our universe among most naturalists and even some creationists (although creationists would have a different perspective of it). It is not universally accepted among scientists, but it is the most popular among that community of scholars. According to this theory, the entire universe exploded into existence somewhere between 16 and 20 billion years ago. What exploded? Well, I’m not trying to ridicule the scientists who offer it as their best explanation for the presence of our universe, but the fact remains that what is basically taught to our children in school is that technically nothing exploded out of nowhere, but nothing created somewhere to put everything that came from nothing out of nowhere. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 21, 2013 in The Big Bang, theory of evolution

 

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Evolution, What Is It?

Evolution

Image from Google Images

What we have termed the ‘Theory of Evolution’, in order for it to be considered a viable theory, it must begin somewhere and with something occurring for the very first time. Therefore, I believe we must first consider cosmic evolution, which is the origin of time, space and matter, or, in other words: what we refer to today as the ‘Big Bang!’ What did it evolve from or perhaps, stated another way, what exploded? Where did it come from, since space did not exist prior to this event; and where did it explode to, since space was born at the same time as everything else? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 19, 2013 in ideology, theory of evolution

 

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Richard Dawkins and Evidence

Richard Dawkins

Richard Dawkins
(Image from Google Images)

Recently, I was given a link to Richard Dawkins’ open letter to his ten year old daughter. According to the website (found HERE), the letter was written September 20, 2006, so his daughter at my writing would be coming up on her 17th birthday this September. In the letter he describes how she could understand the world around her and the key for her, and presumably for everyone who reads his now public letter to his daughter, is evidence. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 17, 2013 in Religion, theory of evolution

 

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The Birth of Geologic Ages

The Geologic Column, as we understand it, today has its roots in the philosophies of the 18th century secret societies. It began as a vehicle to support evolutionary thought in an effort to show that the more complex species had arisen from more ancient, simpler life forms. Nicholas Steno, Roman Catholic bishop from Denmark, who also studied geology, formulated the principle of superimposition, meaning: “Sedimentary layers are deposited in a time sequence, with the oldest on the bottom and the youngest on the top.” Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 15, 2013 in naturalism, theory of evolution

 

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Darwin’s Grandfather and Evolution

Temple of Nature by Erasmus Darwin (image from Google Images)

Temple of Nature by Erasmus Darwin
(image from Google Images)

Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802) was a key philosopher and scientist of the 18th century and was initiated into Freemasonry in Edinburgh, Scotland, attending the same Masonic Lodge as Lord Monboddo. He was the grandfather of Charles Darwin. (Charles, his father and his grandfather all studied medicine at Edinburgh University). In his book/poem published in 1803, a year after his death, Erasmus Darwin wrote: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 13, 2013 in ideology, theory of evolution

 

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Ancient Philosophies Kept Alive

Ancient Greece Today (Image from Google Images)

Ancient Greece Today
(Image from Google Images)

In the third century CE an Alexandrian philosopher by the name of Ammonius Saccus, whom some consider to be one of the founders of Neo-Platonism, worked to reconcile the philosophical schools of the followers of Plato and Aristotle. About this same time two Christians, Clement of Alexandria, and his pupil Origen, formulated an allegorical method of interpreting the Bible. They also believed Plato and Aristotle and Pythagoras originally based their philosophies on the Old Testament, so, according to their interpretation of the ancient philosophers, Plato and Aristotle could be used to interpret Christian doctrine. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 11, 2013 in Ancient Greek Philosophers, theory of evolution

 

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Ancient Philosophers and Evolution

Although Aristotle was a disciple of Plato, many of his ideas can be traced to Pythagoras and the Pythagoreans. Echoing the later scientific understanding of spontaneous generation, he had this to say:

“…other bloodless animals generate indeed, but not offspring of the same kind; such are all that come into being not from a union of the sexes, but from decaying earth and excrements.” (Generation of Animals 1, 1:20-25) Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 9, 2013 in Greek Philosophers, theory of evolution

 

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Plato and the Theory of Evolution

Plato's Phaedrus from his "Dialogues"  from Google Images

Plato’s Phaedrus from his “Dialogues”
from Google Images

Plato is one of the most important figures in our understanding of what would be a Western worldview. In his Dialogues of Plato we are told that Socrates at times discussed the mystical side of life, including reincarnation and religious teachings. Plato was his pupil, but Plato was also influenced by others, including Heraclitus and Pythagoras. Notice what he claims in one of his works: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 7, 2013 in Greek Philosophers, theory of evolution

 

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Ancient Hindu Ideas Travel West

Pythagoras (cir. 582-506 BC), as a wandering student, visited Egypt where he studied under various priests, finally settling in Memphis at the temple of Ptah, where he underwent initiation rites and was taught the sacred mysteries under the pontificate Sonchis, the high priest in Egypt. After a total of 22 years in Egypt, Pythagoras was taken captive and brought to Babylon when the Persian king, Cambyses II, sacked Memphis. In Babylon Pythagoras studied with the Chaldean magi for about twelve years, after which he returned to Samos at age 56 to spread the word. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2013 in Hinduism, theory of evolution

 

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Hindu Biological Evolution

The Hindu religion speaks of a kind of ‘tree of life’ sprouting from the most simple and leading to the more complex—from plant life to aquatic creature, then through amphibians and reptiles, moving upward through various animals graduating to ape-like creatures and then through the humanoid species where evolution becomes a spiritual matter through the principle of yoga. The theory of evolution is quite old and seems to sprout from ancient Hinduism. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 3, 2013 in Hinduism, theory of evolution

 

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