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The Big Bang and Supernovas

23 Jul
The Crab Nebula, shown here as it is today, is the remnant of a supernova which was seen in the year 1054 AD and remained visible to the naked eye for about a year.  (Credit: NASA)

The Crab Nebula, shown here as it is today, is the remnant of a supernova which was seen in the year 1054 AD and remained visible to the naked eye for about a year.
(Credit: NASA)

When a star explodes, it leaves an expanding cloud of residue called a SuperNova Remnant (SNR). The Crab Nebula in the constellation of Taurus and shown in the photo to the left is a good example of a supernova. When it became visible to Earth, the supernova could be seen in the daytime in 1054 for a number of weeks. For galaxies like our own Milky Way every 25-30 years, on average, a star should blow up creating a nova—big stars create supernovas. One must ask how far out does the cloud of the Crab Nebula reach and how long did it take for the cloud to reach the limits we see today?

By applying known physical laws, astronomers are able to predict what should happen in the life of a supernova. While the Crab Nebula is only 8 to 11 light years in diameter at present, it is expanding at a rate of about 1500 km per second. A supernova has three predictable stages. The first stage lasts for about 300 years. This stage is comprised of the initial debris hurled outward from the center of the star at a rate of about 7000 kilometers per second. The first stage ends as a blast wave forms, and by now the SNR should equal about 7 light years in diameter. The second stage of the supernova lasts for about 120,000 years and by this time the diameter of the SNR should reach 300-350 light years. After this time, the SNR would begin to cool, and this signals the beginning of the third stage.

Since we know that an exploding star should reach 300 light years in diameter in about 120,000 years, then there should be several hundred million novas or supernovas that have occurred in our galaxy, if our universe is billions of years old, and SNRs should be abundant in our night sky (on an average of one every 25-30 years), as we observe it using a proper telescope. The problem is that when scientists searched the heavens with the Hubble telescope, they couldn’t find even 300 supernova rings. If the universe is billions of years old, and it must be that old for the Big Bang theory to ever have happened, then why is it that we have evidence for only about 300 novas/supernovas when several hundred million are expected?[1]

Below is a table[2] showing what both naturalists and creationists should expect to see when they search the heavens for supernova remnants with a proper telescope. The last column to the right shows what actually can be observed using the Hubble Telescope:

Supernova
Remnant Stage

Number of observable SNRs predicted if our galaxy were…

Number of SNRs actually observed

… billions of years old

… 7000 years old

First

2

2

5

Second

2260

125

200

Third

5000

0

0

Which worldview would this table support—the naturalist’s or the creationist’s? The answer seems clear—there never was a Big Bang to begin with.


[1] ICR September, 1998

[2] From CMI, Exploding stars point to a young universe; found HERE.

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Posted by on July 23, 2013 in Big Bang Theory, naturalism

 

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