RSS

Monthly Archives: July 2018

Simon of Cyrene

Simon of Cyrene

from Google Images

I wonder if it is possible to know a story so well that one simply misses many of the details? I know I often come to see things differently even after many sessions of reading, discussion and study. Similar things are done inadvertently during ordinary conversation. We may be speaking with someone, but, without waiting for the full story, we jump to the wrong conclusion, only to be corrected by the speaker. Understanding becomes even more problematic when someone we trust tells us of his conclusion about what another friend has said, so, when speaking with the second friend, the blurred truth becomes even more difficult to correct. I believe this sort of thing often occurs when we read and discuss the Bible. We, no doubt, get the gist of the account, but the details that get us there are often taken for granted and obscured. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Simon of Cyrene

Posted by on July 31, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Bookends of Meaning in the Parables

Bookends

from Google Images

Jesus once told his disciples to neither give what is holy to dogs (irreligious people) nor to cast their pearls before swine (religious people with closed minds), because neither group would appreciate their offerings. Instead, they might use what was given them to hurt the disciples (Matthew 7:6). The fact is, this is exactly the position Jesus had taken when he began teaching in parables. The word of God wasn’t appreciated by either the Jewish authorities nor by the people. Both groups showed they had no real value for what Jesus’ preached, and on more than one occasion the religious authorities tried to do harm to Jesus, if not kill him (Luke 4:28-29; 6:11; Matthew 12:14-15). Moreover, since the people were easily intimidated by the Jewish authorities, they also refused to confess him (Matthew 12:23-24; cf. John 9:18-22). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Bookends of Meaning in the Parables

Posted by on July 30, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Pilate’s Verdict of Crucifixion

Pilate

from Google Images

It is reasonable that Pilate would assume the chief priests and the people would desire Jesus’ release instead of Barabbas, because the latter was really guilty of the charges the authorities levied falsely against Jesus. Pilate knew the high priests understood Jesus wasn’t really guilty of the charges they made against him, so why wouldn’t they reject one who was really guilty of the accusations they made against Jesus? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Pilate’s Verdict of Crucifixion

Posted by on July 29, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Preaching to Closed Minds

Closed Mind

from Google Images

Presently, I am involved in a study of Jesus’ parables, as they pertain to the last days. We need to keep in mind that the scriptures say that God spoke to mankind at various times and through a great many different people, both small and great. However, in the last days he sent Jesus (Hebrews 1:1-2), and through Jesus, the Son of God, the word of God has come to us. One of the very first things Jesus made clear to us is that his words could be understood only by those who have ears to hear (Matthew 13:9). This doesn’t mean that the word of God is hidden, but it does tell us that Jesus doesn’t intend to disturb the spiritual blindness that men impose upon themselves by rejecting Jesus, in order to embrace what they’ve always been taught by folks with a diploma (viz. Matthew 12:23-24). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Preaching to Closed Minds

Posted by on July 27, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Who Is Barabbas?

Barabbas - 1

from Google Images

The practice of Roman governors releasing Jewish criminals is never mentioned in ancient books, except in the New Testament. Moreover, many ancient manuscripts don’t have it mentioned in Luke, but this is of no real import, because, even if Luke doesn’t mention it in Luke 23:17, it is mentioned in all three of the other Gospel narratives (Matthew 27:15; Mark 15:6; John 18:39). Moreover, the fact that there is no mention of the practice in Jewish literature is no reason to conclude that the Gospel narratives are wrong, because many ancient records would have been destroyed in the Roman-Jewish War  in 66-70 AD. The fact is that Rome did practice such a custom in other countries of the Empire, where it is recorded that Roman governors released local prisoners during a lectisternium, festivals of the local gods. If this was introduced by Pilate to compensate for the cruelty, for which he at times treated the Jews, it would fit the context of the Passover—an event commemorating the release of Jews from captivity in Egypt (cf. John 18:39). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Who Is Barabbas?

Posted by on July 26, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The Strong Delusion of False Doctrine!

Stron Delusion

from Google Images

I have just embarked on a study of the eschatology of Jesus’ parables, and have been currently involved in a study of Jesus’ first parable, The Parable of the Sower in Matthew 13. I have demonstrated that the reason Jesus spoke to the people in parables, and without a parable he did not speak to them (Matthew 13:34), was so he wouldn’t disturb their hardheartedness (Matthew 13:11). In other words, they had already closed their minds to the truth about the Kingdom of God. They wanted a kingdom, alright, but they wanted the kingdom their way, not in the manner Jesus presented it (cf. John 12:34). They wanted a physical kingdom with a physical king, reigning in physical Jerusalem (cf. 1Samuel 8:4-7). That is not the Kingdom of God (cf. Luke 17:20-21). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on The Strong Delusion of False Doctrine!

Posted by on July 25, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Two Witnesses for Jesus

Pilate and Herod

from Google Images

Josephus mentions an interesting event that occurred about a year prior to Jesus’ crucifixion. Pilate had built an aqueduct into Jerusalem using Temple funds for its financing. When many Jews objected to his use of Temple funds to pay for the project, he had some of his military men disguise themselves and mingle with the crowd of Jewish demonstrators. When Pilate gave the signal, his men began killing Jews in the crowd. They were supposed to kill only the most vocal demonstrators, but they killed indiscriminately, and with such vigor that they slew the lambs, too, which some of the Jews carried, intending to have them slain for the Passover celebration. Thus, the blood of the men was mingled with that of the animals (cf. Luke 13:1), a very distasteful matter among the Jews. Many of these Jews were Galileans, and, when this event was told to Herod Antipas, he also viewed the ordeal with contempt, putting Pilate and him at odds with one another. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Two Witnesses for Jesus

Posted by on July 24, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Bringing in the Day of the Lord

Ears to hear.jpg

from Google Images

I have just begun a series in which I intend to study and discuss the eschatology of the parables of Jesus. The Parable of the Sower was Jesus’ first parable that he preached to the people. It has often perplexed laymen and scholars alike, that Jesus told his Apostles the reason he spoke in parables to the people was permit their blindness to remain undisturbed. That is, he wasn’t going to heal their hard hearts (Matthew 13:11). Rather, his words were meant for those who had “ears to hear” (Matthew 13:9). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Bringing in the Day of the Lord

Posted by on July 23, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Jesus’ Trial Before Herod

Herod Antipas - 3

from Google Images

After Jesus’ first appearance before Pilate, the Jewish authorities could hardly believe their ears, when Pilate pronounced his verdict of innocence! Immediately they began to accuse Jesus more passionately. The Vulgate translates: “But,” they insisted, “He rouses sedition among the people; he has gone round the whole of Judaea preaching, beginning in Galilee and ending here.” The phrase: “…ending here” probably has reference to his entries into Jerusalem in recent days, publicly showing himself to be the Messiah and the large crowds gathering around him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Jesus’ Trial Before Herod

Posted by on July 22, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

It Is Not Given for Them to Understand!

Can't Understand

fromg Google Images

This study represents the first in a series of studies, which I hope to do on Jesus’ parables. However, I don’t intend to do an in-depth study of any. What I want to show is how Jesus’ parables affect our eschatology. Moreover, this study is not a study on eschatology itself, but it will set the stage for what is to follow. Lord bless you as you consider what the word of God says. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on It Is Not Given for Them to Understand!

Posted by on July 20, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Are YOU the King of the Jews?

Are you King of the Jews

from Google Images

Pontius Pilate was a very cruel Roman governor, who ruled the Jews for about 10 years (25/26 AD to 35 AD), during the reign of Tiberius Caesar. The fact is, he was removed from office in 35 AD by his immediate superior, Vitellius, the Roman president of Syria, because of the indiscriminate and cruel manner in which he governed Jewish affairs. The fact is that Pilate was probably a bigot. It seems he bore a hatred for the Jews. From the very beginning he showed little respect for their religious beliefs. Josephus even mentions that when Pilate first took the reins of governorship of Judea, he secretly brought images of Caesar into Jerusalem,[1] something his predecessors hadn’t done, no, nor any governor after him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Are YOU the King of the Jews?

Posted by on July 19, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

With the Sound of a Trumpet

Sound of a Trumpet

from Google Images

This study represents my final study in the series that addresses Matthew 24:36, which some brethren try to use to show a division in the Olivet Discourse. On one side of verse-36, according to their eschatology, is the events leading up to the Lord’s judgment upon Jerusalem in 70 AD. On the other side of verse-36, i.e. verse-36 and following, is the alleged Second Coming of Jesus, which for them is a visible, physical event. I have been demonstrating that this just isn’t so. The scriptures simply don’t support such an understanding. The facts are that Jesus returned spiritually in 70 AD to judge Jerusalem, and at that time he ended the Old Covenant by destroying the Temple in the persons of the Roman armies. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on With the Sound of a Trumpet

Posted by on July 18, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The Charges Against Jesus

Brought Before Pilate

from Google Images

After finding Jesus guilty of blasphemy, a verdict requiring death under the Mosaic Law (Leviticus 24:16), the Sanhedrin, immediately, brought Jesus to the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate (Luke 23:1; cf. 3:1), because, under Roman Law, the Jewish authorities had no right to execute anyone for a crime (John 18:31). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on The Charges Against Jesus

Posted by on July 17, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

When Did the Old Covenant End?

Old Covenant

from Google Images

It seems to me that the date or at least the general time period when the Old Covenant ended would be important to our understanding of eschatology. After all, God’s covenant with the Jews was his modus operandi for about 1400 years, as that pertained to his dealing with mankind. Everything God did in the world, prior to Jesus being born, was either through or as a result of his covenant relationship with the Jews. Even Jesus’ birth was in fulfillment to promises God made to the Jews under that covenant. So, how did the Old Covenant end? Did it end immediately as the new began? Were both in force simultaneously for a period of time? Did it end at all? Is it still in force today, and if so, are both the Old and the New Covenants valid together? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on When Did the Old Covenant End?

Posted by on July 16, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Jesus’ Trial Before the Whole Sanhedrin

Jesus' Trial - 2

from Google Images

One might argue that Jesus’ whole public ministry was one, big, three and a half year trial, but in reality his trials were intermittent. He wasn’t debating with the Jewish authorities every hour of every day, and neither was he correcting his disciples all of the time. I suppose he had many hours of pleasant discourse in what could be termed good times with those closest to him. After all, the text does say he loved his disciples, and they loved him (John 13:1; 15:9; 16:27), and love cannot exist under constant criticism or distrust. Nevertheless, during Jesus’ final hours, he was tried almost constantly. It began during his final meal with his disciples, and the trials didn’t end until the day was over, and he lay peacefully in the grave. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Comments Off on Jesus’ Trial Before the Whole Sanhedrin

Posted by on July 15, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,