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Jesus’ Coming with the Clouds

coming in the clouds

from Google Images

John tells us in Revelation 1:7 that Jesus would come with the clouds, and every eye would see him. But, what does he mean by saying this? Should we expect to see Jesus riding upon a puffy, white, cumulus cloud some day? Some people may think this is exactly what the text, and others like it, means. In other words, the most apocalyptic book among the records of the New Covenant must be taken literally, and, therefore, Jesus has not yet come! I have even seen paintings that indicate Jesus would literally return to the earth riding upon a cloud and all his saints with him. This, however, is far too literal an interpretation for an apocalyptic text such as this one. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on January 29, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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Every Eye Will See Him

every eye will see him

from Google Images

Many folks have used Revelation 1:7 to say that Jesus’ Second Coming has not yet occurred. After all, if every eye would see the Lord, coming on a lily white, cumulus cloud when he returns, and, given the fact that no one has reported seeing such a news worthy event up to this present day, then surely we must still look for Jesus’ Second Coming in the future. Personally, I think it is high time we stop shooting from the hip with the word of God and take the time to investigate what the text really says. Do you really believe you are able to interpret Jesus’ coming by understanding Biblical language in a 21st century context? We need to consider the fact that the whole Bible, that is, the first and second covenants, were written by Jews and for Jews, using a Jewish manner of speaking. In other words, we need to acquaint ourselves with the Jewish culture of the day, and take advantage of the Greek lexicons and other scholarly writings about the Bible available to us today. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 27, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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John’s Testimony Regarding Jesus

faithful witness - 1

from Google Images

In Revelation 1:5 John refers to Jesus as: the faithful witness, the firstborn from the dead and the prince of the kings of this world, but how should we understand these descriptions of our Lord? First of all the Faithful Witness, according to the Scriptures, is the Messiah (Psalm 89:35-37. His throne is established as a Faithful Witness in heaven, just as the sun and moon witness to God’s glory. God has given Jesus as a Witness to the people, as their Leader and Commander (Isaiah 55:3-4). Although his witness was rejected by men (John 3:11, 32), yet his witness is true (John 8:14-16). Nevertheless, some will receive his testimony (John 18:37), and when we embrace the Truth, we have the Witness in ourselves (1John 5:9-10). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 24, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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John’s Greeting in the Apocalypse

john's greeting

from Google Images

Specifically, John wrote to the seven churches of God, which were in Asia (Revelation 1:4), part of the same area to which Peter sent his epistles (1Peter 1:1). The Apostle Paul also wrote letters to churches in seven places: Rome, Corinth, Galatia, Ephesus, Philippi, Colossae, and Thessalonica. The number seven is used 54 times in 31 verses in this book. It is seven churches, seven spirits, seven horns, seven eyes, seven seals etc. Why seven? Many scholars would conclude it is the number of completeness, perhaps derived from the creation week of Genesis 1 & 2. It took God six days to create the universe and every living thing in it, but he didn’t stop there. He created a day of rest on the seventh day by resting on that day. That is, he ceased his labor on that day, not that God was weary and needed to relax. Later he would command that the seventh day would be used as a day of worship to commemorate the completed or whole creation of God (Exodus 20:8-11). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 22, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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The Seven Blessings of the Apocalypse

seven beatitudes of revelation

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In Revelation 1:2 John describes himself as one who bore record of the word of God, the testimony of Jesus and all the things he saw (cf. 1John 1:1-4), and here tells us that blessings are pronounced upon all who read, believe and obey the testimony he reveals, about what was given to Jesus (Revelation 1:3). The reason folks were blessed, if they read, heard and heeded John’s testimony, was because its fulfillment was at hand. John’s readers were persecuted (cf. Revelation 1:9), and John’s testimony was to give them hope. He who endured would be blessed. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 20, 2019 in Book of Revelation

 

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John’s Prologue

john's prologue

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Understanding when the Apocalypse (the Book of Revelation) was written is very, very critical to one’s eschatology. After all, if it was written by John, late in the first century AD, as most scholars believe today, then there was no event at that time (90-100 AD) that would provide the framework into which we could place this prophecy. Therefore, we must look for its fulfillment after the first century AD. On the other hand, if the Book of Revelation was written earlier in the first century AD, during the lives of the Apostles, Peter and Paul, then this prophecy would fit very well within the framework of the Lord’s judgment upon Jerusalem cir. 66 – 70 AD! Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 17, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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The Apocalypse and the Transfiguration

transfiguration

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What could the Book of Revelation possibly have in common with Jesus’ Transfiguration (Matthew 17:1-8; Mark 9:2-8; Luke 9:28-36)? This is a question I had before I heard a preacher[1] speak of it, but I have to tell you, it makes a lot of sense. What the Transfiguration does for the Apocalypse is to place it in a context that demands that the book was written prior to the Jews’ war with Rome cir. 66-70 AD. The context of the Apocalypse is the Day of the Lord, or the Coming of Jesus.[2] The context of the Transfiguration is the Day of the Lord, or the Lord’s parousia (G3952), according to Peter (2Peter 1:16-18)! Interestingly, I’ve never put Revelation 1:1 together with Matthew 17:1-8 and 2Peter 1:16-18, but you can see how they all fit together. They all speak of the Second Coming and, therefore, the Day of the Lord. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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