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Daniels 70 Weeks and the 2300 Days – Part 2

In a previous blog I wrote of the “Abomination of Desolation” and showed how it had more to do with what the High Priests had done against God than with what Antiochus Epiphanes had done in the Temple. The matter of the abomination of desolation did not reflect the act of a foreign king or ‘strong man’ but the condition of the people of God. The Jews wholeheartedly deserted their God and his way. It was a matter of their desiring to be more like those around them than obeying or honoring God. They were led away, not by a foreign despot, but by one of their own, a betrayer or son of perdition—the High Priest. They placed their confidence in him, rather than remaining faithful to God.

It was the jealousy of the two High Priests and their wholesale desertion of the way of God. They fostered hatred and a party spirit by bringing countrymen against countrymen. It was these men who brought upon their country and its Temple the desolation that history records. The abomination that brought judgment and desolation from God was the act of a High Priest who betrayed God and through his influence the wholehearted desertion of God by his people.

The first time the word abomination (H8251) is mentioned in the Bible is in Deuteronomy 29:17 where it tells of the idols of Egypt. It is the sin of the nations, and Israel was commanded not to copy them but to be faithful to the Lord. The first time abomination (H8251) is mentioned in connection with Israel is in 1Kings 11:5 where it records that Solomon went after the abomination of the Ammonites. It was the sin that divided the kingdom in two, and thus began the destruction of Israel. In almost every occurrence of this word, it is connected with idol worship.

The second word, desolation or astonishment (H8074), is either connected with the judgment of God upon evildoers or the astonishment of witnesses at either God’s judgment or a national sin. In 1Kings 9:6-9 at the dedication of the Temple that Solomon built, God promised Solomon the nations will be astonished at Israel’s fate, if he or his people would abandon their Lord and go after other gods. In 2Chronicles 7:21, the companion Scripture, God said the Temple that Solomon built would be an astonishment to all that passed by, if he or the people went after other gods.

The facts are a matter of history. Solomon began the way of destruction in departing from the presence of God by going after the idols of the nations around Israel. It was this act that brought God’s judgment upon Solomon and Israel as a whole (1Kings 11:4-13). The kings of Israel and the kings of Judah led the people away from God. Even periodic revivals were not enough to undo the harm created by Solomon when he practiced idolatry. Indeed all kings were measured in the light of David’s faithfulness to God, but Solomon’s reign, though more splendid than any before or after him, was remembered as the beginning of the abomination (2 Kings 23:13).

Every place where the word abomination (H8251) is mentioned in the Old Testament it records either idol worship or God’s judgment upon Israel or the nations who affected his people. The second word, desolation (H8074), concerns the reaction of others over the fate of nations and people who had been judged by God (cp. Ezekiel 32:10). It concerns the reaction of the righteous over the sin of others (Ezra 9:3-4) or the response of friend over the ill fate of someone they knew (Job 18:20). It is used in Isaiah 52:14 concerning God’s suffering servant, but it usually concerns God’s judgment upon men for rebelling against him.

It was God’s people who brought about the abomination of desolation by following their leader and thus incurring the judgment of God. This is what happened when Nebuchadnezzar destroyed both Jerusalem and the Temple, and it is what happened when Antiochus Epiphanes desecrated the Temple of God. He merely carried out the God’s judgment. Therefore, if this is so, looking for a king or ‘strong man’ to carry out the judgment of God would be like locking the barn after the horse got away. The sin is the abomination, and this sin brings about the judgment of God that causes astonishment.

Therefore, in the case of Jesus’ prophecy (and Daniel’s), the desolation or astonishment occurred in 70 CE with the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple. What caused this destruction or astonishment occurred long before the act of Titus and his army. The abomination that brought desolation or astonishment occurred much earlier.

Daniel indicated it was a sin that brought desolation (Daniel 8:13). The word that is translated transgression in this verse is pesha (H6588).[1] Daniel 8:9 tells us a little horn came out of Rome, one of the horns resulting from the broken great horn (Alexander the Great). This little horn, if taken in the context of what occurred in the time of Antiochus Epiphanies, must refer to a High Priest. It was the activity of the High Priest that brought about the desolation of the Temple then, and (if true to form) it would be a High Priest who would bring about the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple that Jesus predicted.

In Daniel 8:10) we are told that this little horn or ruler (High Priest) became great and was a formidable enemy of God’s people even killing some of their leaders (casting the stars to the ground). He magnified himself as the enemy of the Prince (Jesus) of the host Daniel 8:11, and by him, the little horn, the Daily Sacrifice (Jesus) was taken away (rejected), and the place of his Sanctuary (the Temple) was cast down (made common).

In the first year of Jesus’ public ministry he declared that the Temple was nothing more than a place of business. This was the High Priest’s doing. He was in charge of such things, and we can be certain that this Temple business met with his approval. A sign was asked for and Jesus gave his answer. Destroy this Temple (the body of Jesus) and he would raise it up in three days. Three years later they destroyed the body of Jesus and in three days he rose from the dead, showing he was the true High Priest of God who had the authority to proclaim the Temple unclean (John 2:13-16; Matthew 21:12-13; cp. Matthew 23:37-38; 24:1-2 and Leviticus 14:35-45).

The 2300 evenings and mornings (Daniel 8:13-14, 26) are in reality 1150 days (2 sacrifices per day) between the time of Jesus’ first declaration of the Temple’s uncleanness in John 2 to Pentecost morning when the Holy Spirit fell upon the disciples in Acts 2. The Temple (man) of God was cleansed and, as a result, man bears about the presence of God. Below may be found a graph showing how this would work out on paper.

.

Month 28 CE 29 CE 30 CE 31CE Total
1st 22 ½ days left in the month

(45 sacrifices)

Beginning on 8th day sometime before the evening sacrifice

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

2nd 29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

3rd 30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

7 1/2 days

(17 sacrifices)

Ending on Pentecost Morning

4th 29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

5th 30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

6th 29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

7th 30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

8th 29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

9th 30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

10th 29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

11th 30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

30 days

(60 sacrifices)

12th 29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

29 days

(58 sacrifices)

13th 29 days

(58 sacrifices)

Total days 375 1/2 354 354 66 1/2 1150
Sacrifices 751 708 708 133 2300

.

The 2300 days of Daniel 8 are really 2300 evening and morning sacrifices (1150 full days). These sacrifices began just before Jesus’ 1st Passover on the 8th of Nisan, 28 CE, sometime before the time of the evening sacrifice. So, the evening sacrifice on the 8th would count as the 1st evening sacrifice of the 2300 sacrifices in the next 1150 full days. On this day Jesus said the Temple was unclean (John 2:13-16; cp. Daniel 8:11-14, 26). On the 10th of the month Jesus was set apart from all other Jews for the rest of his ministry and inspected for sins or some evil by which his enemies could accuse him, just as the Passover lamb was taken aside from the flock in the beginning of the 10th day of the first month and inspected for blemishes before being sacrificed on the 14th of the month. The 1150 days ended when the Temple was cleansed on the morning of Pentecost, 31 CE, as the Holy Spirit fell down upon the 1st century Church (Temple) of God, which occurred not long after the final morning sacrifice. Men were cleansed by the presence of the life of God within.

A note of explanation is needed, because the 10th of the 1st month was the day the lamb was taken from the flock and brought into the house and inspected daily for blemishes. So, why do the 2300 evening and morning sacrifices begin on the 8th day and not on the 10th day of the 1st month? It is because the lamb was inspected from the very beginning of the 10th day onward. The 9th day in 28 CE was a Sabbath, so there wouldn’t have been any marketing done within the Temple compound on that day. Jesus had to have declared the Temple unclean sometime before the evening sacrifice on the 8th day of Nisan.

During his final days, a close inspection of the four Gospel narratives would show Jesus “cleansed” the Temple three time on three different days: the 9th (Matthew 21:1-17), the 11th and “Triumphal Entry” (Mark 11:12-20; John 12:12-36) and the 12th (Luke 19:41-48). The 10th day of the first month  was a Sabbath, so just as he had done in 28 CE, Jesus got rid of the market place in the Temple before the 10th day began, which he did 6 days before the Feast Day (John 12:1; cp. Matthew 21:17). After these things, the Jewish authorities were livid. Jesus was cutting into their profits, which was quite a large sum considering the amount of people who had to do business during the Passover with only the Temple money and only the Temple animals. From the 10th of the month onward the Jewish authorities conspired to test him or otherwise find fault with him until they crucified him on the Passover day.


[1] “from pasha (H6586); a revolt (national, moral or religious):- rebellion, sin, transgression, trespass” – Strong’s Concordance.

 

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