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Tag Archives: Archelaus

The Absent Master

Parable of the Talents -3In my investigation of the eschatology of Jesus’ parables, I have come to the Olivet Discourse, and at this time I would like to consider the Parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30). The parable tells of a certain nobleman who went into a far country, but before he left he called his servants together and gave them his talents (money) each according to his ability. It is understood in the parable that, during his absence, the servants were to use their master’s money for his profit. So, after a long time, the nobleman returned and called his servants together, and he reckoned with them (Matthew 25:19), rewarding them according to their works. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on November 25, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Dating the Ministry of John the Baptist

John the Baptist - 2

from Google Images

Luke begins his record of the public ministry of Jesus by introducing him through John, the Baptist. We know from the infancy narratives that John was about 6 months older than Jesus and that he was born into a family of priests. John was a son of Aaron, but instead of ministering in the Temple, where all priests are called to minister (including his father, Zacharias), we find John in the desert. Instead of wearing fine linen (the normal attire of a priest – see Exodus 28), John wore camel’s hair (Matthew 3:4), implying rugged living (cf. Luke 7:25). Something is going on beneath the surface, things are not really as they appear, but what is Luke veiling, and can we know? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 10, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Does Luke Contradict Matthew?

Out of Egypt...

from Google Images

Luke claims Joseph and Mary returned to Nazareth in Galilee, when all things according to the Law were fulfilled (Luke 2:39). What does this mean and is there a contradiction between his account and that of Matthew who claims Joseph and Mary went down into Egypt from Bethlehem before returning to Nazareth? Weren’t “all things according to the Law” (Luke 2:39) performed with Mary’s purification and Jesus’ presentation in the Temple? Actually, there were a few more things yet to be done to satisfy the Law after Mary’s purification was completed. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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What About the Reigns of Herod’s Sons?

Israel Museum

from Google Images

Many scholars have used the length of the reigns of Herod’s sons, which information can be found in Josephus’ histories, to configure Herod’s death to March 13, 4 BC. However, since the eclipse that occurred at the Feast of Purim in 4 BC cannot be used to point to Herod’s death, due to the impossible time restraints involved between it and the Passover (28 to 29 days),[1] we must rethink why the reigns of Herod’s sons point to the year 4 BC, because, as I have said several times in this series, once “you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”[2] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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When Did Herod Die?

Herod

from Google Images

Herod didn’t die in 4 BC as is commonly believed, and I hope to prove that here. I hope to prove it beyond doubt with the information we have from Josephus together with ancient Jewish tradition. Josephus speaks of a lunar eclipse just before Herod’s death. A few hours before the eclipse, Herod executed two beloved rabbis and about 40 of their students for destroying the golden eagle Herod had placed over the eastern gate of the Temple. Had Herod executed these men just before the eclipse in 4 BC, he would have done so on the Feast of Purim. A riot surely would have occurred had he done so. In fact, a sizable revolt did erupt over these things just after Herod’s funeral during the Feast of the Passover, when so many of the pilgrims visiting Jerusalem were stirred up by Jewish zealots. After putting down the revolt, Archelaus left for Rome to formally receive his government from Caesar. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 19, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Quirinius, Governor of Syria

Mary and Joseph going to Bethlehem

from Google Images

Luke claims that Quirinius[1] was governor (hegemoneuo – G2230) of Syria when the enrollment of all the people of the Empire took place (Luke 2:1-2). However, history shows us that either Saturninus or Quinctilius Varus was governor of Syria when Jesus was born.[2] Nevertheless, Josephus also shows us that there were at least two governors of Syria during the time when Herod suspected disloyalty among several members of his family, and when he had them tried and executed.[3] Therefore, it may be possible that Quirinius acted as a governor of some capacity of Syria during the time Jesus was born, or even under some special authority by order of the Emperor to take the census. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 15, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Conflicting Birth Accounts in the Gospels?

It is commonly believed among Bible scholars who trust Scripture is the word of God that, because Herod killed the children of Bethlehem from newborn up to two years of age, the Magi could not have come to Jerusalem, until Jesus was nearly two years old as well (Matthew 2:7, 16-18). However, this does not have to be so. According to Ezra 7:9 it took Ezra and his company exactly four months to travel from Babylon to Jerusalem, and it is implied that he made good time, because God was with him. However, the Magi might have made better time because Ezra could have had some aged people and the very young to care for. So if the Magi started out a few weeks before the conjunction of Jupiter and Venus on August 12, 3 BCE, they could have arrived in Jerusalem and found the child on October 22, 3 BCE, 40 days after Jesus’ birth, after a journey of about 3 months. Of course, being astrologers they could have anticipated the conjunction well in advance of this date and started their journey much earlier and arrived at Jerusalem at a slower pace. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 30, 2009 in Christmas, Religion

 

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