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The Significance of Each Entry

Triumphant Entry - 1

from Free Bible Images

In a previous study I showed that an analysis of all four Gospel narratives, as they pertain to Jesus entry into Jerusalem during his final week of public ministry, points to Jesus entering Jerusalem and the Temple on three different days. Moreover, if we take John 12:14 into consideration, these three entries occurred over the course of four days. It seems when Jesus went to Bethany, the following day was the Sabbath, because Jesus had to search for the donkey and its colt. The text says: “when he had found him” (John 12:14), meaning the colt wasn’t tied at a specific place, but allowed to run free for the Sabbath day. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on April 3, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus’ Three Entries Into Jerusalem

Triumphant Entry

from Free Bible Images

Prior to his coming in Luke 19:28-38, Jesus had instructed his disciples to tell no one that he was the Messiah (cf. Luke 9:20-21). Nevertheless, at this time in Luke 19 Jesus didn’t hold his disciples back. The Messianic fervor was growing, as they journeyed toward Jerusalem (cf. Luke 19:11) and continued to escalate, until they reached the top of Mount Olives. Jesus not only didn’t hold them back, but he, himself arranged for a colt to be at his disposal, so he could ride into Jerusalem in fulfillment of Zechariah’s prophecy (Zechariah 9:9). Jesus did all this in order to publicly present himself as Messiah to the nation, and in such a manner that his enemies wouldn’t be able to stop him or arrest him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 1, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Parable of the Good Samaritan

Good Samaritan

from Google Images

In view of the fact that both the priest and the Levite passed by the wounded man without helping him, it seems the reason for their lack of compassion was to remain ritually pure (cf. Numbers 19:11). However, ritual purity was unable to alter the course the priest and the Levite had taken. They were on the road to death,[1] and nothing they could do or not do could prevent their attaining that goal. Jesus’ parable places the lawyer’s question into an illogical framework. Once he has left God (viz. living in Jerusalem, the city of blessing), he was unable to do anything, apart from God, to attain or inherit eternal life. He is cursed and will die no matter what he does or doesn’t do. In other words, mankind, no matter who he may be, is helpless. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 23, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Man’s Inability to Love Without God

Apart from God

from Google Images

As Jesus traveled toward Jerusalem (Luke 9:51), he spent time in different towns and villages along the way to preach the Gospel of the Kingdom to people living there who might receive him (cf. Luke 9:51-53). At one of those villages a lawyer tested him, trying his understanding of the Scriptures. However, Jesus answer seems to have made the lawyer look foolish. Therefore, the embarrassed rabbi reacted to the Lord’s pointing to the obvious, namely the phylacteries which the lawyer strapped to himself to help him remember his duty to obey the Law. In order to save face, the lawyer tried to get Jesus to answer a question that seems to have been a controversy among the rabbis: “exactly who is my neighbor” (Luke 10:29)? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 21, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Living Under the Curse of the Law

from Google Images

from Google Images

According to the word of God, a curse is not simply a wish for harm but contains the power in itself to inflict that harm. The Law forbids anyone to curse the leader of his people (Exodus 22:28). The phrase immediately before cursing one’s leader is “you shall not revile the gods”. The term gods refers to our rulers (cf. Psalm 82), and we are told that reviling or speaking disgracefully of one’s leader is the same as cursing him. This sort of thing, if done to one’s parents was punishable with death (Exodus 21:17), and to do so toward God was considered blasphemy, and the offender was to be stoned (Leviticus 24:11, 14). Job’s wife told him to curse God and die (Job 2:9). In other words, if he wanted to be relieved of his suffering, all he had to do was curse or revile God, and God would take his life. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 9, 2015 in Epistle to the Galatians, Paul

 

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The Schemes of Hagar

The Bible doesn’t mention anything about what Hagar may have done to hurt Abraham or Sarah, except to say that Sarah was despised in her eyes once Hagar became pregnant. If one were to be satisfied with a simple reading of the text, it could lead to the understanding that Hagar was grossly mistreated by her masters. After all, what did she really do but bear Abraham’s child, which is what Sarah wanted in the first place. If there developed a little rivalry between the women, is Hagar to blame for it all, or might some of the rivalry be due to Sarah’s jealousy over Hagar bearing Abraham’s child rather than her? With the understanding that I am deriving something out of the text that offers only meager hints of what may have been, let’s consider what could have occurred. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 20, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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