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Tag Archives: Gospel

Sending Out the Twelve

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Jesus sent out the Apostles on their own to preach the Gospel of the Kingdom to folks in the region of Galilee (Luke 9:2). Sending them out two-by-two (Mark 6:7) was necessary for the Twelve to learn to do these things by themselves, because Jesus wouldn’t always be there to do the preaching. They had to learn to do what Jesus did. Therefore, Jesus gave them authority over demons and diseases and power to work miracles etc. as signs to show that the word they preached was true (Luke 9:1). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Incorrect Behavior During Persecution

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Living in our modern era, we sometimes feel the need to lash out at people who treat us or others unjustly. After all, it is our right to do so, within the law of the land. We may bring people to court and cause them pay for their indiscretions. Isn’t this the way to stop evil behavior? Force could be reasonably used for a righteous goal, and should be in life threatening situations. However, in other circumstances Christ tells us we shouldn’t resist evil (Matthew 5:39). Rather we should turn the other cheek, which points to an insult, not physical violence. Peter wrote about this very matter in 1Peter 4:15, but this verse needs to be interpreted in the context of the persecution going on in the first century AD. This verse is not speaking of normal law-breaking. Rather, Peter is telling his readers in Asia Minor not to retaliate when they are persecuted. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 25, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Devil

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The name devil (diabolos – G1228) is defined as slanderer. The Scriptures also refer to the devil as the accuser of the brethren (Revelation 12:10). Jesus tells us that Judas Iscariot was a devil (John 6:70-71), implying that he was a false accuser or a slanderer. Jesus could have meant this to show Judas slandered his enemies, but Jesus may also be implying Judas was slandering Jesus in some manner. Perhaps when Judas was sent out to preach the Gospel (cf. Luke 9:1-2), he may have preached a messiah more to his liking (cf. John 12:34), than what Jesus told him to say. In any case, Jesus revealed in Luke 8:12 that it is the devil who removes the word of God (the ‘seed’ in the parable) from the hearts of men. This attaches a kind of omnipresence to a being other than God, unless it can be shown Jesus doesn’t mean to say an actual spirit being takes the word of God out of the hearts of men. Our modern theology seems to make the Devil, called Satan, into a kind of god who possesses God-like powers, but this is impossible. Only the Lord is God, and no one is able to oppose him.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 12, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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If One Suffers for Righteousness

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When I was a youth I was told that Jesus said his followers would be persecuted (cf. Luke 21:12; John 15:20). When we are baptized, the ceremony reminds us that with the Spirit of God comes also the trials of fire (Luke 3:16). We are not promised a bed of roses by coming to Christ, but we are promised his continual presence with us (Hebrew 13:5; cf. Matthew 28:20b). Usually, just knowing the Lord is with us during difficult times is all that is necessary for us to be content, but, even if I found myself perplexed and in fear, when the trial was over I was often astonished, as I looked back and saw the nearness of Christ and his protection through it all. This is not to say that I (or we) live a life of trouble and persecution. Judging from my own history, we do not. Life is usually wonderful, filled with joy and peace, but trouble does come, and Peter spoke to us in his epistle concerning how those times should be lived out. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 28, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Peter… Regarding Wives and Husbands

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Peter spent considerably more time writing about the expected behavior of wives (1Peter 3:1-6) than he did for husbands (1Peter 3:7). Why would he do that? It was probably because women were in a more vulnerable position than men. In Roman life it was expected that women adopt the religion of their husbands. If a believing wife’s husband was an unbeliever, it would be quite a peculiarity in their society, if she didn’t embrace his religion. Even pagan wives were expected to adopt the Christian faith, if her husband was Christian (cf. Acts 16:30-33), because that was the custom. Therefore, the believing wife in an unbelieving household needed more care in Peter’s epistle. She needed to be encouraged in a manner that gave her peace over what she had done, versus what she was expected to do.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 23, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Haustafel or Household Codes

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For the remainder of chapter two and the first few verses of chapter three of his first epistle, Peter offers a list of things one should expect of people who claim to be of the household of God. At the end of chapter two Peter offers the reason for such expected behavior, namely, Christ behaved this way, and so should we. There are several of these lists throughout the New Testament (cf. Romans 13:1-8; Ephesians 5:21 to 6:9; Colossians 3:18 to 4:1). Martin Luther described these lists as haustafel, meaning: household rules or codes. It is a term that has been adopted by scholars when referencing them. Although Peter’s list begins with how one should behave toward civil authorities, it should be remembered that these lists may direct our behavior toward anyone having authority over us or any human institution that has such authority, because it is expected of those of the household of God to behave in a certain manner. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 9, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Our Reward at the Appearing of Jesus

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James tells us that the trial of our faith brings patience or endurance (James 1:3-4). Our reward for enduring the fiery trials of our faith is praise, honor and glory (1Peter 1:7). That is, if we endure until the end of the trial, even our enemies will have to reassess their opinion of us, even if they cannot or will not embrace what we believe. Often an enemy will commend the inner strength of his foe, even if such commendation is expressed in a negative manner. He may even express his respect for the believer’s apparent integrity. Nevertheless, whether or not accolades come from our enemies, Jesus highly esteems the believer (cf. Matthew 10:32). Such is the reward of enduring the troubles of life or the deliberate attacks of those who oppose us. Although our salvation cannot be lost, marred or destroyed (1Peter 1:4), we can lose our reward (cf. 1Corinthians 3:11-15 and Matthew 10:33)—the praise of Jesus for the display of the believer’s inner strength (built up and exemplified in the fiery trial) that demonstrates his or her trust in God. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 9, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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