RSS

Tag Archives: healing

Jesus and Beelzebub

Beelzebub - 1

from Google Images

Beelzebub in the New Testament is the same as Baalzebub, the god of Ekron, in the Old Testament (cf. 2Kings 1:2-3, 6, 16). The same was the god of the Philistines. The name means lord of flies (or dung), but its original ending might have been zebhul, meaning house, making the real name of the god mean lord of the house (of the Philistines). The ancient Jews loved to use a play on words in order to demean a god or a hated ruler.[1] Some scholars understand the deities of one nation of the ancient Near East to be the demons of its neighboring nations. With this in mind, the King of Israel, Ahaziah, sent messengers to Ekron, the chief city of the Philistines, to inquire of Baalzebub to be healed of his ailment (2Kings 1:2), that is, cast out the disease. Jesus claimed to exorcise demons by the power of God (Luke 11:20), but he was accused of healing, or casting out demons, by the power of Beelzebub, the chief of demons (Luke 11:15, 18). Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 2, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

A Young Boy and Our Inner Life

Boy Healed

from Google Images

On the day following the day of his Transfiguration, Jesus returned to the city of Jerusalem from Mount of Olives (Luke 9:37). The disciples were already there (Mark 9:14). Evidently, Jesus had sent them ahead, as he lingered to pray on the mount. Months earlier Jesus had given them authority over demoniacs (Luke 9:1), but they could not cast out the demon from this little boy (Luke 9:40). Jesus rebuked them for their unbelief and healed the boy. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 23, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Sending Out the Twelve

authority-2

from Google Images

Jesus sent out the Apostles on their own to preach the Gospel of the Kingdom to folks in the region of Galilee (Luke 9:2). Sending them out two-by-two (Mark 6:7) was necessary for the Twelve to learn to do these things by themselves, because Jesus wouldn’t always be there to do the preaching. They had to learn to do what Jesus did. Therefore, Jesus gave them authority over demons and diseases and power to work miracles etc. as signs to show that the word they preached was true (Luke 9:1). Read the rest of this entry »

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 16, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Healing versus Sorcery

tassel

from Google Images

After the woman who had secretly touched Jesus from behind in order to be healed came forward, Jesus said to her “Shalom, (or be at peace), your faith has saved you!” (Luke 8:48). Apparently, the woman may have taken part in a number of healing efforts conducted by “spiritual healers” of Jesus’ day. It is interesting that the original text of Luke, the beloved physician (cf. Colossians 4:14), doesn’t mention that the woman spent all her living on physicians who couldn’t heal her. That is, what we find in Luke 8:43 in some translations is contested by some scholars, but that phrase and others pertaining to physicians is found in Mark and is uncontested. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 5, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Jesus and the Sinner

from Google Images

from Google Images

After Jesus’ first meeting with the leaders of Judaism since the beginning of his public ministry, Luke continued to record their response to him and his claim to be the Messiah. They seem to be very attentive of Jesus’ activity, challenging his disciples about his and their willingness to keep company with publicans and sinners. When Jesus saw what was occurring and spoke for his disciples, the doctors of the Law confronted him about his public religious spirit (i.e. fasting). Yet, at each turn Jesus responded in such a manner that exposed the apparent self-righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, showing how they overlooked the weightier matters of the Law, while they made a public show of their own personal religious prowess. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 23, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Strange Things and Paradoxes

from Google Images

from Google Images

Luke tells us that the response to Jesus’ healing of the man stricken with palsy in connection with his saying that the man’s sins were forgiven was paradoxical. The scribes and Pharisees claimed that they “saw strange things today!” (Luke 5:26) The Greek word for strange things is paradoxos (G3861), from which we get our word paradox. The question is then, ‘what was the paradox that Jesus laid before the Pharisees and the doctors of the Law that they found so difficult to embrace? The healing, itself, astonished everyone—both the people and the leaders. Nevertheless, the power or authority behind the healing is what left the leaders of the people speechless and without a comfortable explanation. In fact, Mark tells us that these leaders had never seen their beliefs carried out in this fashion (Mark 2:12). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 13, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Peter’s Mother-in-law’s Fever

from Google Images

from Google Images

Jesus was rejected in Nazareth and challenged in Capernaum, but his disciples trusted him, that what he claimed was true (cf. John 1:40-49; 2:11). Knowing this, it seems justified that the text should show that it was Jesus’ disciples who first asked him to do something on their behalf, not as a sign, but as a work of mercy. That is, they appealed to his compassion (Luke 4:38). This is quite different from demanding a sign like changing stones to bread or leaping from a great pinnacle (Luke 4:3, 9). They weren’t looking for signs and wonders that would appeal to their curiosity, but in their compassion for the weak, they appealed to Jesus’ compassion. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 27, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,