RSS

Tag Archives: inheritance

Eternal Inheritance

Eternal Inheritance

from Google Images

When we come to Matthew 25:31-46, many scholars believe Jesus was speaking of the end of the world, the end of time—some say even of the universe. Many conclude it is not only the time of the coming of Christ (Matthew 25:31), but also of the time of the Great White Throne Judgment (Revelation 20:11-15). Yet, no writer of the New Testament nor any prophet of the Old, ever taught about or even mentioned “the end of time.” Why would anyone even imagine the end of time at this point in the Olivet Discourse? While I would agree that Matthew 25:31 and following is, indeed, the time of Jesus coming, and that it is also the time of the resurrection and of the Great White Throne Judgment, Jesus did not prophesy of people and events 2000 years removed from the first century AD. After all, he came as the Servant of the Jews for the sake of the truth, in order that God could fulfill the promises made to the fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Romans 15:8). Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 6, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Who Might the Unjust Steward Be?

Unjust Steward

from Google Images

Many scholars understand the Parable of the Unjust Steward to be one that is very difficult to interpret. After all, it is often claimed that Jesus seems to commend the unjust steward for his dishonesty (Luke 16:8-9). Such a thing doesn’t seem to fit the context of Jesus’ character. Nevertheless, if one takes the whole of what Jesus claims, before and after this parable, its true senses seems to unfold. Rather, Jesus pointed to what the unjust steward was able to accomplish by influencing the folks in his generation. In other words, he made his wasted (G1287) life benefit him (Luke 16:1, 4) for goals he had set in this world (cf. Luke 16:8). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 28, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jesus’ Knowledge and the New Creation

new-creation-1

from Google Images

As Jesus moved through the thronging crowd of people on his way to the home of Jairus, the ruler of the synagogue at Capernaum, a woman who had a menstrual problem for twelve years came up behind him, touched him, was healed and disappeared back into the thronging crowd. Jesus turned around and asked: “Who touched me?” The question I wish to pose is: did Jesus know who touched him, and if not, how could the woman be healed without Jesus’ prior knowledge? Every healing Jesus had done up to this point was a purposeful healing. Jesus knew what he was doing, and he did it. If Jesus knew he was about to heal the woman, why did he phrase his question as he did? Some scholarship wants to questions Jesus’ knowledge, while others seem to want to give Jesus omniscience as a man. What can we say about these things? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 7, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Believers Are Kept by the Power of God!

from Google Images

from Google Images

If, as Peter claims in 1Peter 1:4, our inheritance is kept safe by God in heaven, what can be said of the lives we live in the present? Our future is secure, but what practical good does that have for us in the present? Peter clams that we, who will inherit immortality, are also presently protected by the power of God (1Peter 1:5). In other words, we are not left alone to face the world by ourselves. Our protection is made effectual through faith. Our faith in God—trusting him—permits him to act on our behalf. Our free will is important to God, so he will not act for us, unless we put our trust in the fact that he cares and will use his almighty power to help us. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 7, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Our Salvation Is in Christ!

from Google Images

from Google Images

In 1Peter 1:3 Peter begins his letter with an accolade of the Father for the great salvation he has provided for us. The word blessed (G2128 – eulogetos) is an adjective which the writers of the New Testament use only to describe God. It is not so exclusively treated in the Septuagint,  but even there the word is meant to show great respect for or to celebrate the one to whom it is addressed.  The participle (G2127 –eulogeo) is used to refer to Christians, but the adjective (G2128) is used only to praise and celebrate God. It is also significant that Peter says “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord, Jesus Christ…” in his doxology, in contrast with “Blessed be the God of Israel”, which was often used in the Old Testament or before Christ (cf. Luke 1:68). No doubt Peter meant to express the fact that Israel, as a nation, had rejected their Messiah, and only those who had received Jesus as their Savior and Lord were then and are now the recipients of God’s grace and peace in abundance (1Peter 1:2; cf. Isaiah 55:1-7). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 4, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,