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Tag Archives: Jacob

Eternal Inheritance

Eternal Inheritance

from Google Images

When we come to Matthew 25:31-46, many scholars believe Jesus was speaking of the end of the world, the end of time—some say even of the universe. Many conclude it is not only the time of the coming of Christ (Matthew 25:31), but also of the time of the Great White Throne Judgment (Revelation 20:11-15). Yet, no writer of the New Testament nor any prophet of the Old, ever taught about or even mentioned “the end of time.” Why would anyone even imagine the end of time at this point in the Olivet Discourse? While I would agree that Matthew 25:31 and following is, indeed, the time of Jesus coming, and that it is also the time of the resurrection and of the Great White Throne Judgment, Jesus did not prophesy of people and events 2000 years removed from the first century AD. After all, he came as the Servant of the Jews for the sake of the truth, in order that God could fulfill the promises made to the fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Romans 15:8). Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on December 6, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The End of All Things Is at Hand

End of all Things - 2

from Google Images

When we speak of the end of the world, according to what we see in 2Peter 3, what do we mean? What did Peter mean? If Peter meant something different from what we see in the text, which point of view should we retain—ours or Peter’s? Lots of folks seem to believe Peter was wrong to believe the end of the time/space continuum was about to arrive in the first century AD. I could go along with that, with this qualifier—Peter really wasn’t speaking of the end of time or the universe. This came to be a later assumption of the text, and such a thing is not found anywhere in the Bible. In other words, belief that time would come to an end and the universe would be destroyed is a modern assumption not supported in the scriptures. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 13, 2017 in Eschatology, Prophecy

 

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The Elect of God

Elect - 1The book of Malachi is an interesting book that concerns itself with the last times, and its themes are mentioned throughout the New Testament. Malachi is concerned with election, judgment, the calling of the gentiles, the change of Temple worship, a change of the priesthood and a number of other matters that the New Testament writers expand upon. It also has something to say about the ministry of John the Baptist and even the coming (parousia) of the Lord. Notice how Malachi begins his prophecy: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2017 in Eschatology, Prophecy

 

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The Eschatology of Luke 13

Table Set for SederIt is interesting that Jesus mentions Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in Luke 13:28. Notice that Jesus also places all of the prophets with them, and all, that is, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob with all of the prophets of the Old Testament would sit down in the Kingdom of God. But, when would this occur? Was Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and all of the prophets already in the Kingdom of God at the time when Jesus preached to the Jews in Luke 13? It would not appear so, because Daniel was a prophet, and he was told to go his way, and he would rest (i.e. lay dead) until the end of days (age). At that time, i.e. at the end of days (or the end of the age), he would arise (Daniel 12:13). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Work of John the Baptist

John the Baptist - 1

from Google Images

Zechariah, John’s father, continued in his song of praise to God in Luke 1:76-79. Here he spoke of what God would do through both John and the Messiah. He calls his son a prophet of the Most High God (Luke 1:76), and said John would go before the Lord (the Messiah) to prepare the way of his coming by preaching knowledge of salvation—i.e. how one could be saved (Luke 1:76-77). It is important to note at this point that Zechariah claimed that this salvation would not necessarily be as was later thought by most Jews during Jesus’ ministry, namely, that the Messiah would deliver them from their Roman oppressor. Rather, Zechariah claimed the Messiah would save his people from their sins (Luke 1:77; cf. Matthew 1:21), and this would be the focus of John’s ministry in preparing his way (Luke 1:76)! Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 8, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Altars of Abraham

God called Abraham first out of the land of Ur (Acts 7:3) and then out of Haran to come into the land of Canaan (Genesis 12:1-4). I don’t believe Abraham made a firm decision to embrace the Lord until he reached Shechem, where he built his first altar. Later, Joshua would lead Israel here, to Shechem; it was a place of memorial where Israel made a firm commitment to receive the Lord as their God and consecrate themselves to him alone. Similarly, this was where Abraham consecrated himself to the Lord by putting away the gods he once served (cp. Joshua 24:1-2) and received the Lord as his God (Genesis 12:6-7). Moreover, after Jacob returned from Haran where he served his father-in-law, Laban, for 20 years, he came to this very place, where he caused his family to give him their foreign gods, and he buried them here, at Shechem (Genesis 35:4). The altar at Shechem stands as a memorial for Abraham’s repudiation of the gods he once served and his receiving, as his God, the Lord who took him out of the land of Ur. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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The Call of the World

Sometime after Abram worshiped God at Bethel, he went down into Egypt, because there was famine in the land of Canaan. Every commentary I consulted criticizes Abram for doing so, yet we have no proof that Abram did not consult God before going, nor do we have any proof that, even if he hadn’t, that he sinned or made a mistake in doing so. What would sin be like without the law of God? According to Romans 5:13, God wouldn’t have faulted Abram, even if he had sinned. So, why should we find fault? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2013 in Abraham, famine

 

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