RSS

Tag Archives: Jews

Eternal Inheritance

Eternal Inheritance

from Google Images

When we come to Matthew 25:31-46, many scholars believe Jesus was speaking of the end of the world, the end of time—some say even of the universe. Many conclude it is not only the time of the coming of Christ (Matthew 25:31), but also of the time of the Great White Throne Judgment (Revelation 20:11-15). Yet, no writer of the New Testament nor any prophet of the Old, ever taught about or even mentioned “the end of time.” Why would anyone even imagine the end of time at this point in the Olivet Discourse? While I would agree that Matthew 25:31 and following is, indeed, the time of Jesus coming, and that it is also the time of the resurrection and of the Great White Throne Judgment, Jesus did not prophesy of people and events 2000 years removed from the first century AD. After all, he came as the Servant of the Jews for the sake of the truth, in order that God could fulfill the promises made to the fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Romans 15:8). Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 6, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jesus Is Our High Tower

Tower - 1

from Google Images

A tower was something used in ancient times for defensive purposes (Judges 9:51). It was a place where the people could flee in the event of an attack from an enemy. It was also used for early warning purposes, in order to detect an enemy’s (human or animal) approach. In the context of Jesus’ parable of counting the cost (Luke 14:28-33), the tower (Luke 14:28) represents the One or ones in whom the people placed their trust. Who would be a better defense for their nation—the Jewish authorities or Jesus? In Jeremiah 6:27, the prophet was set over the people as a tower and a fortress, not to help the people but to observe their wrongdoing and judge them. Herein, we are able to see that the foundation for the idea that the servant of God is a tower is laid in the Old Testament. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 9, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Parable of the Appointed Time

second-coming-of-jesus

from Google Images

In Luke 12:54-56 Jesus criticizes the Jewish people of his generation for not knowing the time in which they lived. That is they didn’t discern the gravity of the moment. They simply let it go by without consideration. They knew when to expect rain or a hot day, but they simply didn’t reflect upon what had already occurred in their presence, in terms of interpreting John the Baptist’s coming and teaching, as well as Jesus own teaching and miracles. They should have known they were living in the last days of the Mosaic Covenant (Deuteronomy 31:29) and the beginning of the times of the Messiah (Deuteronomy 18:15), which would be the time of the New Covenant as predicted by Jeremiah (Jeremiah 31:31-33). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 19, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

What Type of Persecution Was Endured?

persecution

from Google Images

Perhaps due to Hollywood productions that depict early Christians in Roman arenas facing lions and the like, we have come to believe persecution means persecution to the death, but this is not so. We are told that, because Jesus healed the afflicted on the Sabbath, the Jewish authorities persecuted him (John 5:16). The idea that they also sought to slay him is added to the fact that they were already persecuting him in some way or another. In one instance they claimed he was mentally unstable and had a demon (Mark 3:21-22). At other times the authorities stalked him, hoping for an opportunity to take him into custody (cf. Luke 6:7; 14:1; 20:20). They sought out people who would lie about him (Matthew 26:59-61), and provide “evidence” they could use in their effort to have him executed in their courts (cf. John 7:20, 25; 11:49-50, 53). Finally, they paid a large sum of money to have one of his own to betray him (Mark 14:10-11). All this, although culminating in Jesus’ death, was persecution, and Jesus tells us: “If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you (John 15:20).[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 9, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

You Are the Children of God!

not-my-people

from Google Images

It has been claimed that Peter wasn’t writing specifically to believing Jews, because he mentions in 1Peter 2:10 that his readers were in the past “not a people (of God), but now are the people of God.” Paul even uses these words to denote gentiles who were never the people of God (cf. Romans 9:24-25). Paul claims God called the gentiles his people in order to provoke the Jews to jealousy (Romans 10:19; cf. Deuteronomy 32:21). The problem with comparing Peter with Paul and forcing Peter to say what Paul says is: that Paul was sent to the gentiles, but Peter to the Jews. There would, therefore, be obvious differences in their preaching of the Gospel. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 7, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Trusting in the Promise of God

from Google Images

from Google Images

What does Peter mean by saying: “through him you believe in God” (1Peter 1:21)? If his intended readers were believing Jews of the Diaspora (1Peter 1:1), didn’t they already believe in God prior to the coming of Christ and their submission to him? I don’t think Peter meant for us to view his statement quite like that. For example, Jesus claimed in John 12:44 and 14:6 that believing in him is the same as believing in God. Moreover, no one (Jew or gentile) is able to come to the Father (God) except through Jesus. I believe this is what is behind Peter’s statement “through him you believe in God” (1Peter 1:21). It was Jesus who fully expressed the God whom no one had seen (John 1:18) or known (Luke 10:22), so Peter is correct in saying the Jews of the Diaspora believe in God through Jesus, because, prior to Jesus’ coming, the Jews had a poor understanding of God who is love. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 23, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Paul’s Kinsmen

The Gospel of Luke

from Google Images

As Paul sends greetings to the church at Rome from the prominent brethren with him at Chenchrea, Corinth’s eastern harbor in Achaia (Romans 16:1), he mentions Timothy, his fellow worker, and three kinsmen: Lucius, Jason and Sosipater (Romans 16:21). Does Paul mean that these men are simply Jews, or is he referring to his extended family, i.e. blood relatives? In other words, is Lucius related to Paul? If so, then Luke, as shown in previous blog-posts, the writer of the third Gospel is not only a Jew, but one of Paul’s extended family. Can this be logically deduced from the Scriptures? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 31, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,