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Tag Archives: John

The Seven Blessings of the Apocalypse

seven beatitudes of revelation

from Google Images

In Revelation 1:2 John describes himself as one who bore record of the word of God, the testimony of Jesus and all the things he saw (cf. 1John 1:1-4), and here tells us that blessings are pronounced upon all who read, believe and obey the testimony he reveals, about what was given to Jesus (Revelation 1:3). The reason folks were blessed, if they read, heard and heeded John’s testimony, was because its fulfillment was at hand. John’s readers were persecuted (cf. Revelation 1:9), and John’s testimony was to give them hope. He who endured would be blessed. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on January 20, 2019 in Book of Revelation

 

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John’s Prologue

john's prologue

from Google Images

Understanding when the Apocalypse (the Book of Revelation) was written is very, very critical to one’s eschatology. After all, if it was written by John, late in the first century AD, as most scholars believe today, then there was no event at that time (90-100 AD) that would provide the framework into which we could place this prophecy. Therefore, we must look for its fulfillment after the first century AD. On the other hand, if the Book of Revelation was written earlier in the first century AD, during the lives of the Apostles, Peter and Paul, then this prophecy would fit very well within the framework of the Lord’s judgment upon Jerusalem cir. 66 – 70 AD! Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 17, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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The Appointed Time or Season

Appointed-Time

from Google Images

In Revelation 1:3 John writes that his readers need to hear the words of this prophecy and to keep (G5083) or observe the things contained therein, because the time (G2540) was in John’s day at hand. I’ve already developed in previous studies that the Apocalypse was written very early in the first century AD. In this study I hope to show the importance of the word the Apocalypse uses for time, showing beyond doubt that it must point to what occurred to the Jews cir. AD 70. In fact, as we shall see in this study, this prophecy had to have been written early in the first century AD, because there simply isn’t any other event in history that was at hand that could have occurred later in that century into which we could neatly fit the Apocalypse. Moreover, to claim that nearly 2000 years (and counting) translates from the Greek word kairos (G2540) is very unscholarly to say the least, and betrays a bias to honor men instead of God to be more blunt. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 10, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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When Was the Apocalypse Written?

Clement of Alexandria

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Eusebius, a fourth century AD church father and considered to be the “Father of Church History,” interprets Clement of Alexandria, a second and early third century church father (cir. 155-215 AD), saying the Apostle John returned from the isle of Patmos “after the tyrant was dead”, and Eusebius identifies the “tyrant” as Domitian, Emperor of Rome from AD 81-96. He does this at the beginning of his testimony concerning John’s writing the Apocalypse.[1] It also seems as though many modern scholars simply accept Eusebius’ testimony without even consulting Clement. If they do read Clement, it must be with the eyes of Eusebius, because Clement mentions Domitian four different times in his writings, but not once does he claim he was a tyrant or even that he persecuted Christians. Eusebius and, apparently, most modern scholarship have read this understanding into Clement’s works. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 8, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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When Was the Apocalypse Written?

Revelation 17

from Google Images

In a previous study on the Second Coming of the Lord, I showed that Matthew 16:27-28 contains the same constituent elements found in Revelation 11:15-18, so they are, therefore, parallel scriptures, saying the same things. In that study I made the claim that the book of Revelation was written prior to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD. At that time I also pointed to a statement made by one of the church fathers, namely, Clement of Alexandria. He made the claim: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Zechariah’s Song of Praise

Zechariah -2

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Zechariah was filled with the Holy Spirit as he uttered words of praise to God and described the missions of both his son, John, and that of Jesus, the Messiah (Luke 1:67-79). Basically, it can be divided into two parts. First, it is a description of what God had already done (Luke 1:68-75), and, secondly, it is a description of what God intended to do (Luke 1:76-79). Moreover, there are references to Hannah’s song of praise at Luke 1:68-69 and again at verses 71 and 74 (cf. 1Samuel 10:1, 10), inferring that, although Zechariah had been both deaf and dumb during Mary’s visit, there was a lot of discussion going on during her three month visit, through the use of his tablet. Zechariah knew of Mary’s Magnificat. The similarities in his song to that of Hannah’s might be the result of his discussion with Mary concerning Gabriel’s visits. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 5, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Birth of John the Baptist

John the Baptist - Birth

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John the Baptist was one of the seven people God named before they were born.[1] He was six months older than Jesus, because Elizabeth was pregnant with him in her sixth month when Mary conceived. John would later be killed by Herod Antipas, ruler of Galilee, because John had been critical of him for marrying Herodias, his brother’s (Herod Philip) wife. Jesus said there was no greater prophet than John the Baptist, yet only Luke mentions the details surrounding his birth. Josephus tells us that about eight years after John’s death: Antipas was at war with King Aretas, his former father-in-law, whose daughter Herod had divorced in order to marry Herodias. Antipas lost that war taking heavy casualties and losing his authority and presence in key areas where his land bordered that of King Aretas. The Jewish people were convinced Herod’s defeat was punishment from God for killing John the Baptist. What can we know of John? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 3, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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