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Tag Archives: Law of Moses

Paul and Homosexuality

Paul and Homosexuality

from Google Images

While Jesus ministered to a Jewish audience who lived under the Mosaic Law, Paul was called to be the Apostle to the gentiles. His ministry took him primarily into the Greco-Roman culture, the heart of the gentile community. One of the longest passages that addresses the subject of homosexuality is the first chapter of Paul’s epistle to the Romans. Some folks try to tell us that this chapter is all about idolatry. However, this isn’t true, but it is partially true. Paul addresses the degradation of mankind’s relationship with God, and the consequential degradation of human relationships that resulted from the ruin of mankind’s bond to the Lord. Once one destroys one’s connection to the Reality, one’s image of the Reality cannot stand for long. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 12, 2020 in Controversial

 

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Homosexuality and the Law of Moses

Love of God

from Google Images

For some time it seems that homosexuality was considered the worst sin anyone could commit. I know from my own experience, brethren have held out this lifestyle as the chief of sinful behavior. Yet, these same folks seem to wink at adultery and divorce. Many of us have friends, perhaps even family members, who are divorced, once, twice perhaps even three times, but, while we associate with these sinners, we don’t associate with gay people (as a rule; there are exceptions). We befriend folks we know to be adulterers and at times eagerly listen to their bragging / confession about their sexual escapades, but who would want to listen to a gay’s night out? Gay bashing is also forgivable, because, after all, they deserve it—don’t they? God hates gays—doesn’t he (John 3:16). Jesus died for adulterers, murderers, thieves, idolaters, but not gays—right? Do we really get to choose whose sins are the greatest, or who is and who is not forgiven? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 9, 2020 in Controversial

 

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The Woman with the Issue of Blood

tassels

from Google Images

While he was on his way to heal a young girl, a woman who had in issue of blood for twelve years (Luke 8:43; Mark 5:27-28) came up behind Jesus and touched him, hoping to go undetected. She believed that by touching Jesus she would be healed, and she thought that going to him among the thronging crowd her presence and purpose would go unnoticed. She was immediately healed, and her bleeding stopped (Luke 8:44). Mark 5:29 says that the woman felt in her body that she was healed of that plague. What she did was reach out and touch one of the four fringes or tassels, which hung from Jesus’ outer garment (Luke 8:44; cf. Numbers 15:38-39; Matthew 23:5). They were there to remind devout Jews of the Lord’s commandments and one’s duty to obey them. It had a set apart or holy significance (Numbers 15:40) that the woman reached out to touch, hoping to be made whole. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 2, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Prisoners of War and Slavery

POW camp

from Google Images

No matter what the age, and no matter what country one might speak of, prisoners of war present a local problem for that country, and those prisoners are usually put to work (sometimes for a small wage) in some manner within the nation who captured them. This was no less true for ancient Israel. Certainly, most of these gentiles were uncooperative. Certainly they would have been held against their wills, and certainly they would have been made to work under armed guard. This is no less true for POWs in America during World War II than it was for ancient Israel under its kings (cf. 2Samuel 12:31; 1Kings 9:15, 20-22).[1] Yet, though POWs were forced to serve their captors, who would conclude that this was slavery in the same vein as the slave institution that was practiced in early American history? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 22, 2015 in apologetics

 

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The Dignity of the Poor Under the Law

Hammurabi CodeOnce we understand that it was God’s desire to eliminate poverty in the land (Deuteronomy 15:4), the Scriptures that concern servitude take on new meaning, especially when one considers that in the year of release (every 7th year) the master was to load down the released servant (the poor) with gifts (Deuteronomy 15:13-14).[1] In other words the wealthy were called upon to offer an image of God in their persons, in that, because their ancestors were once bondservants in Egypt and God released them, so they were to do for their servants as God had done for their ancestors. Therefore and unlike accusations coming from the new atheists meant to denigrate God, great dignity was afforded the poor, just as Israel was given great dignity in the eyes of the Egyptians when God redeemed his people from bondage in Egypt. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 10, 2015 in apologetics

 

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Helping the Poor in Ancient Israel

Women Reaping the Fields

from Google Images

The problem of the poor is with us even today.[1] I wonder, in the event that someone is able to show he is qualified to judge, who met or meets the need of the poor better—affluent America or ancient Israel under the Law of Moses. Certainly, neither America nor Israel can be held up as offering the ideal problem-solving method, because the poor existed throughout Israel’s history, and they still exist in America today. No nation in history has ever solved the problem of the poor in their societies. Even if many were cared for, many were not. Even if many were fed, clothed and sheltered, few (if any) were taught to feed, clothe and acquire shelter for themselves. So, which method is better, and who is qualified to judge? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 8, 2015 in apologetics

 

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The Immodest Lady Wrestler

Eye for and Eye principle

from Google Images

Several ANE cultures called for bodily mutilation for certain crimes.[1] For example, the Laws of Hammurabi prescribe one person’s tongue cut out for denying his or her adoptive parents were indeed his or her parents. In another case, if a child struck his father the child’s hand would be cut off.[2] Yet in Israel even the “eye for an eye” references in the Old Testament are not to be taken literally, but figuratively for justice should fit the crime.[3] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 3, 2015 in apologetics

 

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Does God Condone Rape?

Bible

from Google Images

Some view Deuteronomy 22:28-29 as God excusing the act of rape or at least not being sensitive to the victim—a young woman. Is this true, and how can we answer such a charge? First of all, we should never take a few lines of Scripture out of their context and think to make an accurate appraisal of the intended meaning. The judicial decision in Deuteronomy needs to be placed within the context where it is found in order to understand its meaning.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2015 in apologetics

 

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The Spirit of Jealousy Trial

Jealousy

from Google Images

In Numbers 5:11-31 we find a very strange ceremony, at least by modern standards, whereby suspicion of guilt over adultery is satisfied by one drinking holy water. First, the water is mixed with the dust of the Tabernacle, making it bitter (Numbers 5:17). Afterwards, an offering is made by burning barley meal on the altar of God (Numbers 5:12-15, 23-26). The point is, if the person is guilty, that one’s belly would swell up and the thigh would rot (Numbers 5:27)—presumably death would follow. Nevertheless, if death did not follow, the Law does prescribe public execution (Leviticus 20:10).[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 17, 2015 in apologetics

 

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The Mosaic Law and Human Sacrifice

from Google Images

from Google Images

Does the Mosaic Law ever condone human sacrifice? I must conclude the answer to that question is no. The idea that the Mosaic Law does condone such a thing is born in the hearts and minds of the Biblical critic, whose bias simply will not permit a proper and contextual reply to Biblical difficulties, They draw their conclusions by reading into the text that God simply didn’t like it when Israel sacrificed their children to other gods,[1] thus, emphasizing their bias against a proper and contextual point of view. Nevertheless, I’ll try to point out a few more of their common claims and show where their understanding deviates from the context of Scripture. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 12, 2015 in apologetics

 

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Human Sacrifice and Jephthah’s Daughter

from Google Images

from Google Images

Richard Dawkins realizes that Christian apologists do interpret Genesis 22 differently than he does, and he abhors what we claim.[1] If he didn’t, what sense would his book, The God Delusion, make, and, perhaps more to the point, what profit could he ever make in commercializing God in a negative style? With the Abraham-and-Isaac event behind him, he goes on to tell us of another human sacrifice in the book of Judges: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 10, 2015 in apologetics

 

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Moses and Hammurabi

from Google Images

from Google Images

It can be shown that, prior to the Law of Moses, the Israelite patriarchs most likely lived under the Code of Hammurabi, an ancient Babylonian law code discovered by archaeologists in 1901.[1] For example, in Genesis 15:2 Abraham recognized that his slave born in his household would be his heir in the event Abraham had no sons. This was determined by the Law of Hammurabi (sec. 191). Sarai’s giving her maidservant, Hagar (Genesis 16:3), to Abraham was also prescribed by this code (sec. 146). Other instances, including Judah’s demanding that his daughter-in-law, Tamar, be executed by fire (Genesis 38:24; cf. sec. 110), and Jacob’s sons’ concession that the thief who ‘stole’ a silver cup from Pharaoh’s palace should be executed (Genesis 44:9; cf. sec. 6), show that the Israelite patriarchs submitted themselves to these ancient Babylonian laws which date back to cir. 1754 BC.[2] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 5, 2015 in apologetics

 

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Questioning Paul’s Authority

from Google Images

from Google Images

We see from Paul’s opening line in Galatians 1:1 that his authority as an Apostle sent by God was being questioned. From the very beginning Paul seems to emphasize that his authority came not from men but from God. Therefore, the men from James must have sought to undermine Paul’s position as a legitimate Apostle of Christ, before they could have hoped that the Galatians would listen to their doctrine, which removed its adherents from the grace found in Christ (Galatians 1:6). Apparently these men began by saying Paul was a man-pleaser. That is, he sought to please the gentiles of Galatia by not requiring them to be circumcised (Galatians 1:10), which these men taught was necessary for salvation (Acts 15:1). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2015 in Epistle to the Galatians, Paul

 

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Friendship with the World

Both Peter and Jude hold up the judgment of Sodom and Gomorrah as a type of God’s judgment against evil behavior. But to whom is the warning given? It should be seen the warning is not given to unbelievers, for they are either ignorant of God’s word or hold it in contempt. It is rather to believers that the warning is given. Peter says the judgment came as a witness for all those who would afterward live ungodly (2Peter 2:6). Jude’s message specifically mentions he is putting the believers in remembrance who “once knew” (Jude 1:5), but seem now to be ignorant of God’s judgment against sexual immorality and engaging in the fulfillment of unnatural desire (Jude 1:7). Understanding this, that is, that both Peter and Jude are mainly concerned about the believer, we are able to view the story of Lot in its correct context. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 22, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Abram’s Call

We find Abram first in the land of Mesopotamia in Ur, living with his father. He has a wife named Sarai, but no children (Genesis 11:26-30). According to the text the whole family left for the land of Canaan, not saying why, but stopped at Haran and stayed there. If it weren’t for Stephen in Acts 7:2-4, we might believe God first called Abram while he dwelt in Haran (Genesis 12:1-4). But, Stephen claimed that the call at Haran was God’s second call to Abram; the first was while he dwelt in Ur! How should we understand this? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 17, 2013 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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