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Tag Archives: Law

How John Handled His Doubts

Faith Erases Doubt

from Google Images

Immediately after Jesus raised up the dead son of the widow of Nain, the people began spreading the news throughout all the regions of Galilee and into Judea that a great Prophet had arisen among them. The sense of this remark is that they referred to the Prophet whom Moses predicted would come (Deuteronomy 18:15). This Prophet would be similar to Moses in that he would show the Jews how they must behave. He would be a Second Moses; the Targum Jonathan calls him the Second Deliverer at Deuteronomy 18:15. His coming implied Moses (i.e. the Law) was not enough. Either changes had to be made or a deeper meaning had to be revealed. Moreover, if anyone didn’t listen and obey this Deliverer, God, himself, would call that person into account (Deuteronomy 18:18-19). What is interesting at this point is who began to doubt Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 18, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Believers Are Kept by the Power of God!

from Google Images

from Google Images

If, as Peter claims in 1Peter 1:4, our inheritance is kept safe by God in heaven, what can be said of the lives we live in the present? Our future is secure, but what practical good does that have for us in the present? Peter clams that we, who will inherit immortality, are also presently protected by the power of God (1Peter 1:5). In other words, we are not left alone to face the world by ourselves. Our protection is made effectual through faith. Our faith in God—trusting him—permits him to act on our behalf. Our free will is important to God, so he will not act for us, unless we put our trust in the fact that he cares and will use his almighty power to help us. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 7, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Jesus and Moses

from Google Images

from Google Images

In Luke 5:33-39 Luke records Jesus making four pairs of contrasts: fasting and feasting, an old garment and new cloth, old wineskins and new wine, and old and new wine. All have to do with religious practice and how Jesus disciples relate to God, versus how this was done under the Old Covenant. Some contrast the Church and Judaism, but this isn’t enough. The heart of the matter is not simply Jewish tradition. Rather, the problem is with the Mosaic Law. Moses and Jesus are at odds in this respect, namely, that law and grace simply have no common ground. One cannot cry out for justice and forgive at the same time. Nevertheless, Jesus did not come to destroy the Law but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17)—i.e. to complete it, furnish what it lacked and pay its demands. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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When Mary Greeted Elizabeth

Mary and Elizabeth

from Google Images

Why would Luke highlight the meeting between Mary and pregnant Elizabeth? He could have simply stated that Mary hurriedly visited and stayed with Elizabeth for about three months. Yet, he does not. He considers their meeting important enough to use up precious space in his narrative (a scroll[1]) to record their meeting and greeting one another. What does all this mean for believers both in the first century AD and today? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 28, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Authentic Boast

from Google Images

from Google Images

“Before concluding his letter Paul returns once more to the antithesis of cross and circumcision, setting them forth this time as representing respectively the true and the false ground of boasting, and thus carrying a stage further his polemic against the Judaizers and their way of legal observance (Galatians 5:2-12).”[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 21, 2015 in Epistle to the Galatians, Paul

 

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Fulfill the Law of Christ

from Google Images

from Google Images

Christ tells us that we have responsibilities toward one another (1John 3:16). We are not on our own; Christ is with us (Matthew 28:20; Hebrews 13:5). Neither are we alone with respect to one another, for we are called to come to one another’s aid (Luke 22:31-32). No man lives to himself (Romans 14:7); he has responsibilities to others, others have responsibilities toward him. In the world we are made to feel success and failure are personal matters, and each of us bears that responsibility individually or alone. This is not so in Christ. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 17, 2015 in Epistle to the Galatians, Paul

 

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Walking in the Spirit

from Google Images

from Google Images

“Walking is a metaphor used from time to time in Scripture to denote spiritual progress. People in the first century could not travel as fast as we do, with our cars, planes, trains and the like, but even so, for them as for us, walking was the slowest way of going places. But even though walking was slow and unspectacular, walking meant progress. If anyone kept walking, she or he would certainly cover the ground and eventually reach the destination. So, for the apostle walking was an apt metaphor. If any believer was walking, that believer was going somewhere.”[1] In this case, walking in the Spirit (Galatians 5:16) meant walking in the life of Christ, the will of God. We are going somewhere in our relationship with him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 10, 2015 in Epistle to the Galatians, Paul

 

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