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Tag Archives: Moses

Where Was Jesus’ Transfiguration

Transfiguration - 1

from Google Images

Some scholars have claimed that Jesus’ Transfiguration occurred on one of the mountains near Caesarea Philippi, Mt. Hermon is a popular suggestion. Still others have suggested it occurred on the top of Mt. Tabor, which is located in lower Galilee, near the Valley of Jezreel. Other locations, having less support, have been put forward including Mt. Sinai. Nevertheless, one would have to say little can be known for certain, about where Jesus’ Transfiguration occurred. It is, therefore, with some degree of trepidation that I propose yet one more mountain that, as far as I know, has never been suggested, although it seems to fit in the context of Jesus’ activity, as we see him ministering in the Scriptures. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 14, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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How John Handled His Doubts

Faith Erases Doubt

from Google Images

Immediately after Jesus raised up the dead son of the widow of Nain, the people began spreading the news throughout all the regions of Galilee and into Judea that a great Prophet had arisen among them. The sense of this remark is that they referred to the Prophet whom Moses predicted would come (Deuteronomy 18:15). This Prophet would be similar to Moses in that he would show the Jews how they must behave. He would be a Second Moses; the Targum Jonathan calls him the Second Deliverer at Deuteronomy 18:15. His coming implied Moses (i.e. the Law) was not enough. Either changes had to be made or a deeper meaning had to be revealed. Moreover, if anyone didn’t listen and obey this Deliverer, God, himself, would call that person into account (Deuteronomy 18:18-19). What is interesting at this point is who began to doubt Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 18, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus and Moses

from Google Images

from Google Images

In Luke 5:33-39 Luke records Jesus making four pairs of contrasts: fasting and feasting, an old garment and new cloth, old wineskins and new wine, and old and new wine. All have to do with religious practice and how Jesus disciples relate to God, versus how this was done under the Old Covenant. Some contrast the Church and Judaism, but this isn’t enough. The heart of the matter is not simply Jewish tradition. Rather, the problem is with the Mosaic Law. Moses and Jesus are at odds in this respect, namely, that law and grace simply have no common ground. One cannot cry out for justice and forgive at the same time. Nevertheless, Jesus did not come to destroy the Law but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17)—i.e. to complete it, furnish what it lacked and pay its demands. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Was God Cruel to the Midianites?

Baal-peorSome Biblical critics seem to want to demonize the God of the Bible over his treatment of the Midianites in Numbers 31. What really occurred there and why did Moses command Israel to slay all the non-virgin women and all the male children with the sword? Some have accused God of genocide in this passage, and that over the trifle matter of calling him by a different name. Is that true, and if not why was God so upset over the worship of Baal-Peor? How was the virginity of the young females found out? Is it true that Israel violated these innocent girls by performing an inspection of some kind on their genitals? Serious accusations such as these arise out of emotional outrage and usually a misunderstanding of the text, but let’s try to understand what really went on. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2016 in apologetics

 

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God’s Approach to an Uncivilized World

from Google Images

from Google Images

I remember discussing God’s method of salvation in a Sunday school class a few years ago. One of those in my discussion group said she had recently decided to read the whole Bible and began in the Old Testament. She was shocked with all the blood and death, and commented that she was glad to have been born this side of the cross. I understood her response to it all, because I could remember similar feelings while reading Judges 19-21 where eleven tribes or Israel rose up against the Benjaminites and almost wiped out the entire twelfth tribe. I could hardly believe what I read, but it was there, and I couldn’t deny how it unsettled me. I get similar feelings watching programs on TV like Criminal Minds. While I appreciate the acting and like the fact that evil is always put down, I simply cannot take a steady diet of the horrific details of its theme. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2015 in apologetics

 

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What Purpose Did the Law Serve?

from Google Images

from Google Images

In Galatians 3:19-25 Paul anticipates and answers the question Galatian Jews might have when considering his argument thus far. Namely: what purpose did the Law serve (cf. Galatians 3:19)? Obviously, it had some godly purpose, because for over a millennium the Jewish nation related to God through the Law of Moses. The esteem in which Moses is held among the Jews is probably second only to their honor for Abraham. Moreover, the New Testament concludes that the Law was holy, just and good (Romans 7:12), and that, if life and righteousness could have come through a written code, surely righteousness would have come through the Law of Moses (Galatians 3:21). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2015 in Epistle to the Galatians, Paul

 

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The Beginning of Monotheism

from Google Images

from Google Images

Chris (or the summary he presents of Karen Armstrong’s book A History of God) tells us in his video (HERE)that the Enuma Elish, or the Babylonian creation story depicts the prehistoric world as “formless and void”, yet, when I searched for these words in the Enuma Elish, they were not there, neither was the word chaos. The reason for this is that chaos is personified in the myth. One must interpret the Babylonians gods, Tiamat and Apsu, to be chaos, if one is to see the world before law and an orderly environment appeared. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2015 in 70 Weeks Prophecy, atheism, naturalism

 

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