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Tag Archives: parables

Matthew 22 and Revelation

Lord Almighty Reigns

from Google Images

In the past few studies I have been demonstrating that The Parable of the Wedding Feast (Matthew 22:1-14) foretells the destruction of Jerusalem and the end of the Old Covenant. I have also been showing how Jesus’ eschatology was being drawn from the Old Testament prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea and Malachi. Moreover, when we compare the New Testament epistles with Jesus’ parables, we find a common eschatological theme, showing the coming of the Lord, God’s judgment upon Jerusalem and the Temple, the ending of the Old Covenant and the resurrection all occur in the first century, cir. 70 AD. In this study I hope to show, using the content of Matthew 22, that the very same themes run through the book of Revelation. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The Banquet and the Resurrection

Wedding Banquet

from Google Images

In The Parable of the Wedding Feast (Matthew 22:1-14) Jesus told of a king who made a banquet for his son. He sent out servants to his guests, telling them to come to the wedding, because everything was ready. However, the guests refused to come, and they mistreated the king’s servants, even to the point of killing some of them. When the king heard of what they did, he sent out his armies and killed those wicked man and destroyed their city. What we need to understand is the motif of the wedding banquet is found in the Old Testament. This was the well from which Jesus drew the message of his parables. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 25, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Jesus’ Words and Revelation 14

Babylon is Fallen - 2

from Google Images

For some time, now, I’ve been demonstrating that Jesus’ parables lay the foundation for what is taught elsewhere in the New Testament about the last days, i.e. Jesus’ parables establish the New Testament’s eschatology. Moreover, the fact is that Jesus doesn’t teach anything new, but he does show how the Old Testament prophecies unfold in history, as they pertain to the end times. In other words, Jesus shows how the prophets should be understood. So, in effect, his parables are like a hub, which ties the prophecies of the Old Testament and the Gospel of the New Testament, together. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 30, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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‘The End Times’ Context

Death swallowed up

from Google Images

For awhile now, I have been demonstrating that, when Jesus spoke of the end of the age, he was speaking of resurrection, of judgment (especially upon Jerusalem and the Temple), and of the reward of the righteous. If these conclusions are correct, then we should see the same mentioned in the epistles, because one cannot divorce the eschatology of the parables from the eschatology of the rest of the New Testament. I have demonstrated in my previous study that the Apostles’ mention of the end of the age in Matthew 24:3 was evidence of their recalling what Jesus said earlier in Matthew 13:39 and 49 in two of his first parables. Thus, they equated the eschatology to the destruction of the Temple with Jesus’ eschatology of resurrection and judgment, for certainly the Temple couldn’t  be destroyed, unless the Lord had passed judgment upon it. Thus, its destruction would occur at the end of the age (Matthew 24:3). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 27, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Understanding the Parables

Parables of Jesus

from Google Images

It has been said, “If a parable has to be explained, it loses much of its force, just as a joke does when someone doesn’t get it and needs an explanation.”[1] The problem with accepting this analysis is that the reasons Jesus gave for his speaking in parables was, first of all, to hide the mysteries of the Kingdom of God from those who had hardened hearts toward the word of God (Matthew 13:10-15), and, secondly, to reveal those mysteries to the elect or those who had ‘ears to hear’ (Matthew 13:9, 16-17, 34-35). Moreover, sometimes even the disciples didn’t “get it” and the parables had to be explained (Luke 8:9; Matthew 13:36). Far from being akin to telling a joke, the parables are the keys to understanding the New Testament mysteries (Matthew 13:35). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 8, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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In What Age Did Jesus Live?

Age of JesisLately, I’ve been involved in a study of the eschatology of Jesus’ parables, and in my most recent study I mentioned the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares (Matthew 13:24-30), which is explained in verses 36-43. In this study I wish to continue where I left off in that one. What we have is the wheat (believers) growing alongside of the tares (unbelievers) until the harvest. At that time the tares are gathered first and burned in a fire, and Jesus says, “so will it be at the end of this age” (Matthew 13:40; emphasis mine). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 3, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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Bookends of Meaning in the Parables

Bookends

from Google Images

Jesus once told his disciples to neither give what is holy to dogs (irreligious people) nor to cast their pearls before swine (religious people with closed minds), because neither group would appreciate their offerings. Instead, they might use what was given them to hurt the disciples (Matthew 7:6). The fact is, this is exactly the position Jesus had taken when he began teaching in parables. The word of God wasn’t appreciated by either the Jewish authorities nor by the people. Both groups showed they had no real value for what Jesus’ preached, and on more than one occasion the religious authorities tried to do harm to Jesus, if not kill him (Luke 4:28-29; 6:11; Matthew 12:14-15). Moreover, since the people were easily intimidated by the Jewish authorities, they also refused to confess him (Matthew 12:23-24; cf. John 9:18-22). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 30, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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Preaching to Closed Minds

Closed Mind

from Google Images

Presently, I am involved in a study of Jesus’ parables, as they pertain to the last days. We need to keep in mind that the scriptures say that God spoke to mankind at various times and through a great many different people, both small and great. However, in the last days he sent Jesus (Hebrews 1:1-2), and through Jesus, the Son of God, the word of God has come to us. One of the very first things Jesus made clear to us is that his words could be understood only by those who have ears to hear (Matthew 13:9). This doesn’t mean that the word of God is hidden, but it does tell us that Jesus doesn’t intend to disturb the spiritual blindness that men impose upon themselves by rejecting Jesus, in order to embrace what they’ve always been taught by folks with a diploma (viz. Matthew 12:23-24). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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The Strong Delusion of False Doctrine!

Stron Delusion

from Google Images

I have just embarked on a study of the eschatology of Jesus’ parables, and have been currently involved in a study of Jesus’ first parable, The Parable of the Sower in Matthew 13. I have demonstrated that the reason Jesus spoke to the people in parables, and without a parable he did not speak to them (Matthew 13:34), was so he wouldn’t disturb their hardheartedness (Matthew 13:11). In other words, they had already closed their minds to the truth about the Kingdom of God. They wanted a kingdom, alright, but they wanted the kingdom their way, not in the manner Jesus presented it (cf. John 12:34). They wanted a physical kingdom with a physical king, reigning in physical Jerusalem (cf. 1Samuel 8:4-7). That is not the Kingdom of God (cf. Luke 17:20-21). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 25, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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Bringing in the Day of the Lord

Ears to hear.jpg

from Google Images

I have just begun a series in which I intend to study and discuss the eschatology of the parables of Jesus. The Parable of the Sower was Jesus’ first parable that he preached to the people. It has often perplexed laymen and scholars alike, that Jesus told his Apostles the reason he spoke in parables to the people was permit their blindness to remain undisturbed. That is, he wasn’t going to heal their hard hearts (Matthew 13:11). Rather, his words were meant for those who had “ears to hear” (Matthew 13:9). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 23, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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It Is Not Given for Them to Understand!

Can't Understand

fromg Google Images

This study represents the first in a series of studies, which I hope to do on Jesus’ parables. However, I don’t intend to do an in-depth study of any. What I want to show is how Jesus’ parables affect our eschatology. Moreover, this study is not a study on eschatology itself, but it will set the stage for what is to follow. Lord bless you as you consider what the word of God says. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 20, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The Context of the Parable of the Sower

parables

from Google Images

As Jesus entered his second year of public ministry, some women, Mary Magdalene, Joanna and Susanna, mentioned in Luke 8:2-3, became his financial supporters in the same vein as the women who sustained Elijah (1Kings 17:1, 9-16) and Elisha (2Kings 4:8-11). It appears that Luke mentions these women here in order to identify figures he mentioned previously in Luke 7. The mother of the Roman centurion’s servant is Joanna,[1] the widow of Nain is Susanna, and the unnamed woman at the Pharisee’s dinner held in Jesus’ honor is Mary Magdalene. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 8, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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