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Tag Archives: Paul

Speaking of Evil of Angels

False Teachers

from Google Images

Some interpret 2Peter 2:11 as though Peter were speaking of angelic beings. However, if one understood Peter referring to angelic beings, of what good would that serve? If an angel was slandered, what has that to do with the Gospel? It seems to me such an understanding is high sounding, but it has little value, as it pertains to how one should walk with Christ in this world. As I’ve said elsewhere, the Greek word anggelos (G32) can refer to either an angelic being or a human messenger. It can even refer to a physical annoyance (2Corinthians 12:7) that serves to recall something in the past or remind us of something that would come later. To simply say 2Peter 2:11 refers to angelic beings, I believe goes beyond the context of Peter’s epistle. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 29, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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An Overview of Second Peter

2peter-overviewIn his second epistle Peter identifies himself as Simeon Peter,[1] using the Hebrew pronunciation of his name. He must have written this epistle before the Nero persecution of 64 AD, when tradition claims both he and Paul were executed as martyrs for Christ. In such a case, the timeline for Peter’s second epistle would be during Paul’s imprisonment or from cir. 56 AD to 64 AD. Most likely, however, Peter wrote it sometime after James’ death, which occurred cir. 62 AD. All things considered, it probably dates between 62 and 64 AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2017 in Epistles of Peter, Gospel of Luke

 

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Responsibilities During Persecution

restoration

from Google Images

The term elder (G4245 – presbuteros) was the Jewish term for leader. The gentiles used the term bishop or overseer (G1985 – episkopos) to designate a leader of a city etc. In 1Peter 5:2 Peter begins to exhort the elders, or the leaders of the local church bodies in Asia Minor, concerning the responsibilities of their office by telling them to feed or tend the flock of God. The Greek word (G4165) means more than simply feed (the sheep). It takes into consideration providing for the needs (of the sheep) like pasture land, water, and safety. Leadership and protection are factors when defining this word (cf. John 10:11-12). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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What Type of Persecution Was Endured?

persecution

from Google Images

Perhaps due to Hollywood productions that depict early Christians in Roman arenas facing lions and the like, we have come to believe persecution means persecution to the death, but this is not so. We are told that, because Jesus healed the afflicted on the Sabbath, the Jewish authorities persecuted him (John 5:16). The idea that they also sought to slay him is added to the fact that they were already persecuting him in some way or another. In one instance they claimed he was mentally unstable and had a demon (Mark 3:21-22). At other times the authorities stalked him, hoping for an opportunity to take him into custody (cf. Luke 6:7; 14:1; 20:20). They sought out people who would lie about him (Matthew 26:59-61), and provide “evidence” they could use in their effort to have him executed in their courts (cf. John 7:20, 25; 11:49-50, 53). Finally, they paid a large sum of money to have one of his own to betray him (Mark 14:10-11). All this, although culminating in Jesus’ death, was persecution, and Jesus tells us: “If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you (John 15:20).[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 9, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Haustafel or Household Codes

christian-and-culture

from Google Images

For the remainder of chapter two and the first few verses of chapter three of his first epistle, Peter offers a list of things one should expect of people who claim to be of the household of God. At the end of chapter two Peter offers the reason for such expected behavior, namely, Christ behaved this way, and so should we. There are several of these lists throughout the New Testament (cf. Romans 13:1-8; Ephesians 5:21 to 6:9; Colossians 3:18 to 4:1). Martin Luther described these lists as haustafel, meaning: household rules or codes. It is a term that has been adopted by scholars when referencing them. Although Peter’s list begins with how one should behave toward civil authorities, it should be remembered that these lists may direct our behavior toward anyone having authority over us or any human institution that has such authority, because it is expected of those of the household of God to behave in a certain manner. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 9, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Centurion’s Request in Luke 7

centurion

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Some folks see similarities between the centurion of Luke 7 and the centurion, Cornelius, whom Luke mentions in Acts (cf. Acts 10:1-4). Besides their both being of the same rank in the military, they were both God-fearers (Acts 10:1). Both would have been aware of Jewish traditions of uncleanness associated with contact with non-Jews or gentiles (Acts 10:28). Both were generous with the wealth they had. The centurion seeking Jesus loved the Jews and built a synagogue for them (Luke 7:5), while the centurion who sent for Peter was noted for his love for the Jews and his generosity toward the Jewish people (Acts 10:2, 4, 22). Although these similarities don’t measure up to proof that the two are the same person, I believe it is probable they are one and the same person. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 1, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Paul’s Kinsmen

The Gospel of Luke

from Google Images

As Paul sends greetings to the church at Rome from the prominent brethren with him at Chenchrea, Corinth’s eastern harbor in Achaia (Romans 16:1), he mentions Timothy, his fellow worker, and three kinsmen: Lucius, Jason and Sosipater (Romans 16:21). Does Paul mean that these men are simply Jews, or is he referring to his extended family, i.e. blood relatives? In other words, is Lucius related to Paul? If so, then Luke, as shown in previous blog-posts, the writer of the third Gospel is not only a Jew, but one of Paul’s extended family. Can this be logically deduced from the Scriptures? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 31, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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