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Tag Archives: Pharisees

Luke and Egyptian Folklore

Rich Man and Lazarus - 2

from Google Images

It might be interesting to discuss the possible literary genre of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus. Some scholars believe its theme has been borrowed from Egyptian folklore. The problem with this idea is that Jesus would have no reason to use pagan literature to speak to the Jews, especially his disciples. Moreover, since there are obvious doctrinal issues with the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus, why would Jesus use gentile literature to teach anything about the Kingdom of God. On the other hand, if the Jewish authorities were already using this story, which **they** borrowed from Egyptian folklore in order to support their own worldviews (Titus 1:14; cf. 2Timothy 4:4), then Jesus would have good reason to use it, if he wanted to expose error in the doctrines of the Jewish authorities of his day. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on December 17, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Is Experience Better Evidence for Truth?

Evidence

from Google Images

In the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus the rich man believes that a resurrection would alert his brethren to be forewarned of their fate, if they didn’t repent. Since the rich man’s sins aren’t mentioned, one sin that he may have in mind is the doctrine of the Sadducees that there was no life beyond the grave. They didn’t believe in a resurrection, so God’s blessings were to be received in one’s life on earth. There simply was nothing else. Therefore, the rich man thought his brethren needed to be warned that there was, indeed, an afterlife, and they needed to be aware of consequences of their actions. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 14, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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What Was the Sin of the Pharisees?

Unjust Steward - 1

from Google Images

While Jesus was teaching his disciples the Parable of the Unjust Steward, the Pharisees were listening to what he had been saying, and they ridiculed him (Luke 16:14; cf. Psalms 123:4; Proverbs 1:22). Why would they do that? What did they see in Jesus’ parable that offended them? Without saying that the Pharisees and rabbis understood the parable completely, they probably would have been able to understand that the rich man was God. Moreover, from this deduction, it wouldn’t have been difficult to understand that the steward whom the rich man rejected must point to the Jewish authorities in that day. Therefore, they ridiculed Jesus’ teaching. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 7, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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John the Baptist

John the Baptist - 1In the past few studies I’ve been looking at the book of Malachi, as this book is drawn from in the New Testament, and using this knowledge of the relationship between Malachi and the New Testament to define the eschatology of the New Testament writers. So far, it has been somewhat surprising to understand the magnitude of the influence this little book has had upon what we read in our New Testament scriptures. Nevertheless, this little journey has not only been surprising for me, it has also been pleasant and encouraging. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2017 in Eschatology, Prophecy

 

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Who Might the Unjust Steward Be?

Unjust Steward

from Google Images

Many scholars understand the Parable of the Unjust Steward to be one that is very difficult to interpret. After all, it is often claimed that Jesus seems to commend the unjust steward for his dishonesty (Luke 16:8-9). Such a thing doesn’t seem to fit the context of Jesus’ character. Nevertheless, if one takes the whole of what Jesus claims, before and after this parable, its true senses seems to unfold. Rather, Jesus pointed to what the unjust steward was able to accomplish by influencing the folks in his generation. In other words, he made his wasted (G1287) life benefit him (Luke 16:1, 4) for goals he had set in this world (cf. Luke 16:8). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 28, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Ignorant of the Love of God

ignorantIt probably seems obvious to believers today that the father in the Parable of the Prodigal Son points to our heavenly Father. The freedom of choice the father had offered his son (Luke 15:12), the longing he had for his son’s return (Luke 15:20) and the great joy, which he expressed when his son’s return was realized (Luke 15:22-23), all point to how our heavenly Father treats us. Nevertheless, aside from the sinner who wandered away or who accidentally became lost or even the one who made deliberate choices to separate himself from God, what about the ignorant sinner who really believes he has served God all his life? What can be said of him and his return to God? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 26, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Heart of God Toward the Sinner

Prodigal Son - 1

from Google Images

In the Parable of the Prodigal Son, when his young son was still on his path home, his father ran to him, while his son was still some distance away (Luke 15:20b). It is implied in this verse that our heavenly Father meets us at some point in our journey back to him. He makes certain that we don’t have to make the full journey of repentance alone. The fact that the father of the young man ran to him would seem quite unfitting in the custom of the day, and this expresses the idea that our heavenly Father will not react toward us, in the manner in which we expect of him. Far from being angry over what we’ve done, he is always ready to give us much more than we desire. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 23, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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