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Tag Archives: Pharisees

A Scoffer’s Myth

ScoffersPeter spoke of the myths of the false teacher (2Peter 1:16) or scoffers (cf. 2Peter 3:1-3). It may surprise some believers that some of these myths that were used by the Biblical critics of the first century AD have been preserved in the New Testament. One is quite obvious and is found in Luke 20:27-33 where the Sadducees sought to test Jesus in an effort to refute the doctrine of the resurrection. These men were scoffers or Biblical critics, the forerunners of our modern critics who labor to show the untrustworthiness of Scripture by pointing to seemingly unreasonable sayings or contradictions in the text. Nevertheless, just as the Lord used Scripture to show the error of the Sadducees, we can do the same today, if we trust God to help us understand what the Scriptures say. Another, not so obvious myth is found in Luke 16. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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A Faithless and Wicked Generation

Faithless Generation

from Google Images

Obviously, a cursory read of any one of the Gospels leaves a lot unsaid that could be understood and help the reader to understand what Jesus said and did in its original context. Luke’s account of the young boy healed by Christ is no different. Many things await comparison with the other Gospel records, and even some matters can be gleaned by thinking about what is not said but could be implied by what is said. For example, the fact that the father brought his son to Jesus, might have been part of a conspiracy by the Jewish authorities at Jerusalem to expose Jesus as a fraud, and thereby destroy him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 30, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Awakening Jairus’ Only Daughter

jairus-daughter

from Google Images

A messenger, someone from Jairus’ house, came to tell him his daughter had died (Luke 8:49), and he mentioned to Jairus that Jesus shouldn’t be troubled (G4660) further (Luke 8:49; Mark 5:35). This same Greek word is used by the Roman centurion (Luke 7:6), when he told Jesus it wasn’t necessary for him to enter the centurion’s house. If a Jew entered the home of a gentile it would bring trouble on him from those strictly observant Jews who jealously guarded their separate status, concerning the gentile community (cf. Acts 11:2-3).[1] So, the messenger from Jairus’ home implied, if Jesus continued to the house, Jesus would be troubled or harassed by some of the folks who were already there (cf. Luke 8:53). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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It’s a Matter of the Heart

fertile-soil-3

from Google Images

After delivering the Parable of the Sower, Jesus revealed privately to his disciples that the seed is the word of God (Luke 8:11), which is sown in a man’s heart (Luke 8:12, 15). The hearts of some men are described in Luke 8:5-8 in varying degrees of receptiveness to the word of God, which is what makes the hearts of men useful to the Kingdom of God. In Luke’s first example, he tells us that some men’s hearts are just too hard for spiritual life (Luke 8:5, 12). The hearts of these men are trodden down, as though their hearts had no value (Matthew 7:6; cf. Hebrews 10:29) The birds eat the seed deposited there, so the word of God is never permitted to take root so that these men might consider the will of God. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 10, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Doubt, Unbelief—What’s the Difference?

doubt-factorAs we walk through these studies in Luke, we need to understand the difference between the attitudes of John the Baptist, Simon the Pharisee and the sect of the Pharisees and the Jewish authorities. Jesus warned of the blessings that were meant to go to the Jews but would ultimately go to the gentiles, if the Jews wouldn’t repent and receive the Gospel Jesus preached (cf. Luke 4:24-27). History reveals that the Jews, as a whole, didn’t believe Jesus, so the Gospel eventually went out to the gentiles, and they were granted the privilege of preaching the word of God to the world throughout this age, something up to the 1st century AD had been granted only to the Jews. Yet, one has to wonder about at least some believers. John the Baptist (Luke 7:18-23) and Simon the apostle of Jesus (Luke 7:36-50) show they doubted Jesus was the Messiah. Why were they excused, but the Pharisees and the Jewish lawyers punished? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 1, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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No Greater Prophet

none-greater-than-john-1

from Google Images

After John’s disciples left to return to John with a message from Jesus (Luke 7:24), Jesus turned to the people who remained. They seemed to have been aware of the fact that John questioned the direction of Jesus’ ministry, and it seemed obvious that he had expressed some displeasure in what Jesus was and was not doing. Some of those people may have been offended with John’s request, but Jesus was not. Therefore, Jesus turned to the people and asked them why they went out of the cities in order to hear John. What did they expect to find? They could not have expected to find someone tossed by the wind (Luke 7:24), because John wasn’t fickle with words. That is, people couldn’t take John’s words to mean anything they interpreted them to mean (cf. 1Corinthians 1:17). They knew John wasn’t double-minded. They knew he wasn’t tossed and carried away by every wind of doctrine (James 1:6-8). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 20, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Caretakers of the Vineyard!

from Google Images

from Google Images

Late in his ministry Jesus spoke a parable before the people and the Jewish leaders (Luke 20:9-19). There he spoke of God planting a vineyard (the Jewish people), letting it out (giving the oversight) to certain men among the Jews (viz. the priesthood of Aaron; cf. Leviticus 8:10-11; Deuteronomy 24:8; 33:8-10) In the course of time God sent his Son (the Messiah) to receive the fruit of what was his (Luke 20:13). The problem is that the caretakers had become corrupt and never intended to release the fruit of the vineyard to its owner. Rather, they intended to steal it by killing, God’s Son, the Heir (Luke 20:14). However, although they were able to kill Jesus, the Son of God, (Luke 20:15), their plan to usurp the inheritance was seen for what it was and foiled from the beginning of Jesus’ ministry. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 6, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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