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Tag Archives: Rebellion

Murders, Sorcery, Fornication and Theft

Sorcery

from Google Images

The text in the ninth chapter of the Apocalypse continues on to say that the rest, who weren’t slain by the judgment of the Sixth Trumpet, refused to repent of their murders, sorceries, fornications and thefts (Revelation 9:21). I don’t believe the sense has to be immediately following the deaths of one-third of the Jewish population. Rather, I think the sense pertains to during the judgment itself, while the deaths were occurring all around them, still the Jews didn’t consider their deeds and repent. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 17, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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The Second Seal – The Red Horse

second seal - 1

from Google Images

Keeping in mind that the book that Jesus was unsealing in chapter six of the Apocalypse is the same book the Father had given him that would unveil Jesus to his disciples (Revelation 1:1-3), the second seal was removed by Jesus who sat upon the throne (viz. Revelation 5:1-5). When the second seal was broken, John saw the second living being, probably the one who was like a bullock (Revelation 4:7), who then commanded the second rider to “Go!” (Revelation 6:3), and John saw a fiery colored horse, and its rider was given a huge sword (Revelation 6:4). This is the vision, but what does it mean? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 4, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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Bookends of Meaning in the Parables

Bookends

from Google Images

Jesus once told his disciples to neither give what is holy to dogs (irreligious people) nor to cast their pearls before swine (religious people with closed minds), because neither group would appreciate their offerings. Instead, they might use what was given them to hurt the disciples (Matthew 7:6). The fact is, this is exactly the position Jesus had taken when he began teaching in parables. The word of God wasn’t appreciated by either the Jewish authorities nor by the people. Both groups showed they had no real value for what Jesus’ preached, and on more than one occasion the religious authorities tried to do harm to Jesus, if not kill him (Luke 4:28-29; 6:11; Matthew 12:14-15). Moreover, since the people were easily intimidated by the Jewish authorities, they also refused to confess him (Matthew 12:23-24; cf. John 9:18-22). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 30, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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Jesus’ Betrayal and Arrest

Betrayal

from Google Images

After his prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane was over, and he was satisfied that his Father had reached out to comfort him through the presence of an angel, Jesus came to his disciples and found them sleeping for sorrow. Luke tells us that he told them to wake-up and pray, so they wouldn’t enter into temptation (Luke 22:45-46). The other Synoptics have Jesus telling his disciples to continue sleeping, but many scholars believe Matthew’s and Mark’s “Sleep on, now, and take your rest…” should be a question: “Do you sleep and take rest now?” (Matthew 26:45; Mark 14:41). If this is so, we have total agreement between the three records of Jesus’ prayer in the garden. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus Being Ironical

Ironical

from Google Images

While they were in the state of unbelief, Jesus asked his Apostles, when they went out with the Seventy (Luke 22:35; cf. 10:4) and enjoyed the success of their labor, did they lack anything, and, of course, they replied they lacked nothing. In other words, while in the state of belief, they lacked nothing. God was with them, and they enjoyed success in everything they did in the service of the Kingdom of God (cf. Luke 10:17). However, now that they were in the state of unbelief, Jesus said they needed to do the opposite of what he had commanded them in Luke 10:4. In other words, they needed to take their purses and their scrips (shepherd bags), because, while in the state of unbelief they could not expect the provision of God. In fact, if they had no swords, they would now need to sell even their garment to buy one, because without faith they couldn’t expect the protection of God (Luke 22:36). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Great Apostasy

Apostasy

from Google Images

In the context of eminent judgment (Luke 17:24-37), Jesus offers us the Parable of the Unjust Judge in chapter eighteen of Luke’s Gospel. After telling the parable (Luke 18:1-7),[1] Luke records Jesus saying: “When the Son of Man comes will he find **the** faith on the earth” (Luke 18:8). The text has **faith** (G4102) with the article (G3588). The article is in the Greek but not in the translation. Therefore, Jesus is recorded as wondering if, by the time of his coming and due to the great persecution going on, he would find the faith on the earth. That is, the faith that would expect him to return to vindicate those suffering under persecution. Would he find anyone crying out to him at his coming? Would, whatever is there, be recognizable as **the** faith Jesus had begun? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 18, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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War in Heaven

Fall of Satan

from Google Images

In order for the idea to be true that demons are fallen angels, there had to have been some kind of conflict between the forces of good – God and his angels – and the forces of evil – God’s enemy and his angels. Yet, when those of us who believe or believed at one time that a ‘war in heaven’ did occur look into the word of God (the Bible), we are surprised to find that no account of such a conflict exists. I know I was surprised when I began to search the pages of God’s word to prove the teaching I had been told about Satan and his demons falling from their positions of glory in heaven. Yet, since there is no such clear record of such a thing occurring in the Bible, how did we come to believe a war between God and Satan occurred? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 9, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Angels Who Sinned

Angels who sinned - 2

from Google Images

After mentioning false teachers would arise within the church and bring in destructive heresies, Peter connects their work with that of the false prophets of the Old Testament. Those spiritual leaders brought upon themselves and the Jewish nation the judgment of God that culminated in the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple. Likewise, a similar judgment would be incurred by the false teachers who troubled the believers in the five Roman provinces of Asia Minor in the first century AD. In the next few verses (2Peter 2:4-9) Peter points to three examples of God’s judgment that was imposed upon those who sinned in a similar fashion, as was then occurring in the churches of God in Asia Minor. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Don’t Be Afraid of the Enemy’s Fear

facing-fear

from Google Images

In 1Peter 3:8 Peter tells his readers to be of one mind. However, this is in the context of being of one mind with the believers’ enemies. This suggests a meaning of the believer seeking to understand the motives of those who seek to him harm. With this in mind, we shouldn’t be intimidated with the same fear that directs the thoughts and behavior of those who oppose us (1Peter 3:14b). The question arises, then, what did Peter’s readers’ enemies fear? I believe we are able to answer this question by reading the Scripture that Peter seems to refer to in his epistle. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 29, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Believer and Civil Authority

civil-authority

from Google Images

At the top of Peter’s list of how believers should behave we find submission to the political authorities. We in modern America tend to object to the kind of submission both Peter and Paul hoped believers would embrace. To actually endure wrongful treatment without objection seems absurd in our society (cf. 1Corinthians 6:7). Yet, the context of Peter telling his readers to submit to the civil authorities (1Peter 2:13-14) comes at a time when some great trial (1Peter 1:7; 2:20; 3:14, 17) enveloped the whole of five Roman provinces in Asia Minor (1Peter 1:1). Such a trial almost always includes at least the assent, if not the assistance, of civil authorities. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 12, 2016 in Epistles of Peter, Gospel of Luke

 

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The Overthrow of the World

from Google Images

from Google Images

Peter uses the phrase the foundation of the world in 1Peter 1:20. I believe Adam’s rebellion is in view with this phrase in the KJV and other translations of the New Testament. The Greek word katabole (G2602) has been translated almost exclusively by the English translators as foundation, creation or beginning (in the several translations I possess)—all referring to the creation of the world by God. The sole exception is Hebrews 11:11 where the word (G2602) is translated conceive in order to show Sarah was given the ability to give birth to Isaac. It is my understanding that this Greek word (G2602) has not been rendered properly by the translators, and I believe I am able to prove my argument by showing how its related word, kataballo (G2598), is translated in the New Testament. Katabole (G2602),[1] which appears eleven times in the New Testament, is the noun, while kataballo (G2598), appearing three times, is the verb. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 18, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Three Temptations of Jesus

Temptation - 3

from Google Images

Luke tells us that Jesus was led in the wilderness and was there tempted by the Devil for forty days (Luke 4:1-2), and the sense seems to be that this was done immediately after his baptism. At his baptism, Jesus was identified as God’s Son (Luke 3:22; cf. Matthew 3:17; Mark 1:11), and Luke also identifies him as God’s Son through Adam in Luke 3:23-38. Knowing this, the words: “If you are the Son of God…” (Luke 4:3, 9) seem to be a direct challenge of what God says in Luke 3:22. Therefore, it suggests the challenge’s nearness to the proclamation of God. Nevertheless, the account in John seems to dispute the account of Jesus’ temptations we find in the Synoptics, because Jesus seems to enter Galilee two days after his baptism (John 1:29, 35, 43), and already seems to be choosing his disciples. There doesn’t seem to be room for a 40 day temptation period.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 30, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Messiah’s Baptism

Baptism of the Spirit and Fire

from Google Images

Luke tells us in Luke 3:16-17 how John described Jesus’ baptism. Nevertheless, Scripture records that one of the reasons Jesus left Judea after John was imprisoned by Herod was that the Pharisees knew that he baptized more than John (John 4:1, 3). Yet, the Scripture also makes a point in revealing that Jesus, himself, baptized no one (John 4:2). Jesus’ disciples did the baptizing, just as Christians continue to do today. This is simply a baptism of water to which folks come to confess that they have repented of their rebellion against God and receive Jesus as their Lord. So, not only doesn’t Jesus do the baptizing, but the method is water, just like that of John. This couldn’t be the Messiah’s baptism of which John spoke, could it? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 2, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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What Actually Ended with John?

Kingdom of Priests

from Google Images

Isaiah spoke of the Jews warfare being accomplished (Isaiah 40:2), that is, it ended, or was fulfilled. What does that mean? Later in Luke Jesus claimed “The Law and the Prophets were until John…” (Luke 16:16). Clearly, something having to do with the Jew’s relationship with God ended in the first century AD, and something else took its place, namely, “…since that time the Kingdom of God is preached…” (Luke 16:16). It seems an appointed time or age ended with the coming of John’s ministry, and another appointed time or age began with the coming of Christ. What can we know of these things? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 14, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Message of John the Baptist

John the Baptist - 6

from Google Images

According to the Gospel of Luke John lived in the wilderness of Judea until the time of his public ministry (Luke 3:2; cf. 1:80). After he was called by God, he went to the regions around the Jordan River, first of all because his ministry involved immersion (baptism) into running (living) water. Secondly, crossing the Jordan is what Israel did in order to take the Promised Land. John’s presence there may also point to the expectation of Christ’s ministry beginning at the Jordan River as the ‘other’ Prophet like Moses (Deuteronomy 18:15). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 12, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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