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Tag Archives: Resurrection

Every Eye Will See Him

every eye will see him

from Google Images

Many folks have used Revelation 1:7 to say that Jesus’ Second Coming has not yet occurred. After all, if every eye would see the Lord, coming on a lily white, cumulus cloud when he returns, and, given the fact that no one has reported seeing such a news worthy event up to this present day, then surely we must still look for Jesus’ Second Coming in the future. Personally, I think it is high time we stop shooting from the hip with the word of God and take the time to investigate what the text really says. Do you really believe you are able to interpret Jesus’ coming by understanding Biblical language in a 21st century context? We need to consider the fact that the whole Bible, that is, the first and second covenants, were written by Jews and for Jews, using a Jewish manner of speaking. In other words, we need to acquaint ourselves with the Jewish culture of the day, and take advantage of the Greek lexicons and other scholarly writings about the Bible available to us today. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on January 27, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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John’s Testimony Regarding Jesus

faithful witness - 1

from Google Images

In Revelation 1:5 John refers to Jesus as: the faithful witness, the firstborn from the dead and the prince of the kings of this world, but how should we understand these descriptions of our Lord? First of all the Faithful Witness, according to the Scriptures, is the Messiah (Psalm 89:35-37. His throne is established as a Faithful Witness in heaven, just as the sun and moon witness to God’s glory. God has given Jesus as a Witness to the people, as their Leader and Commander (Isaiah 55:3-4). Although his witness was rejected by men (John 3:11, 32), yet his witness is true (John 8:14-16). Nevertheless, some will receive his testimony (John 18:37), and when we embrace the Truth, we have the Witness in ourselves (1John 5:9-10). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 24, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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Understanding the Apocalypse

Understanding the Apocalypse

from Google Images

The Apocalypse never directly quotes a passage from the Old Covenant. However, according to several scholars the book’s 404 verses contain from nearly 300 to nearly 600[1] allusions and echoes of Old Covenant passages. For example, we are told in Revelation 1:1 that God revealed a secret that would shortly come to pass to Jesus who in turn gave it to his angel who then gave it to Jesus’ disciple, John to disclose to the Church. Under the Old Covenant, we are told that it is God who reveals secrets that would come to pass (Daniel 2:28-29), but the Lord wouldn’t do anything before he revealed his secret to his servants, the prophets (Amos 3:7). So, in the very first verse of the Apocalypse we have an allusion to at least two Old Covenant passages.

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Posted by on January 3, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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The Eunuch

Dry Tree

from Google Images

In the past few studies I’ve been discussing the implications of Luke 20:27-38, while Jesus never mentions the eunuch in this segment of scripture, the future of the eunuch in the next age is, nevertheless, drawn from what Jesus claimed about that age, the age of the sons of the resurrection, and I hope to show the truth of this statement in this study, which shall be drawn from Isaiah 56. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 18, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Children of the Resurrection

Children of the Resurrection - 1

from Google Images

In my previous study I began to highlight Jesus’ discussion with the Sadducees (Luke 20:27-38), which on the one hand called the resurrection into question, but Jesus also placed the resurrection in the context of preaching the Gospel. Many Christians think Jesus spoke of an age when men and women wouldn’t marry or have children, but this is not the point of Jesus’ reply to the Sadducees (Luke 20:34-36). The context of the discussion concerns how men become the children of God (Deuteronomy 14:1). The Sadducees argued that the resurrection couldn’t be valid, because their myth (Luke 20:27-33), if placed in the context of the levirate marriage law, made the resurrection appear as though it were a ridiculous doctrine. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 13, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Judgment of the Nations

Sheep and GoatsNot long ago I had believed Matthew 25:31-46 depicted a time when Jesus would judge the whole world, i.e. every man and woman who ever lived. The problem with this understanding is, it removes it from the context of the rest of the Olivet Discourse. The Olivet Discourse concerns events that would transpire in the Apostles’ expected lifetimes. Remember, the Apostles were troubled over Jesus’ prediction that the Temple would be destroyed (Matthew 23:37-39; 24:1-2). Therefore, later, four of them approached Jesus privately and asked: when these things would take place, and what would be the sign of his coming and the end of the age (Matthew 24:3). For Jesus at this point to then speak of universal judgment, i.e. every man and woman who ever lived, snatches this parable out of the context of the first century AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The Day and the Hour

Day and hour - 6Looking at the Parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13), specifically the eschatology of the parable, I notice that Jesus tells his Apostles, “Therefore watch, for you do not know either the day or the hour in which the Son of Man comes” (verse 13). Futurists will tell us that this directly relates to Matthew 24:36, which they use as the dividing scripture in the Olivet Discourse, saying that all of what comes after Matthew 24:36 is for our future. In other words Jesus was speaking of events that would take place cir. 2000 years into the future. Nevertheless, I’ve demonstrated in a great number of studies that this simply cannot be so.[1] We must consider audience relevancy, i.e. the first century audience. How did they understand Jesus’ statements? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 22, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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