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Tag Archives: Sadducees

The Gospel Cannot Be Hid

LeavenThe Lord warns us that we need to beware of hypocrisy. What we are within will be made manifest to others. It is impossible for any of us to hide our true character forever. Eventually, God will bring all things hidden out into the open. The heart of the hypocrite is open to the Lord, and believers are no different. Our hearts, for good or for bad, are open to him as well. The implication Luke 12:1-12 is that the inner realm is much stronger than that of the outer. We cannot hide who we are. In Matthew 10:27, it is the Jesus who spoke in darkness, and what he said had to be proclaimed in the light. In Luke 12:3, it is we who speak in the darkness, and God, for honor or dishonor, will bring that to light as well. What the Lord whispers in our ears will be made public, and what we whisper in the ear of others cannot be hid. It must be made public. There is a power at work here that we are unable to see, but we are able to witness its effect. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on August 10, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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“The Only Good Prophet Is a Dead Prophet”

Prophets

from Google Images

Jesus’ offering himself as the Jews’ Messiah at Jerusalem was rejected by the authorities there (cf. Luke 11:15-16), which consisted of both Pharisees and lawyers. The lawyers were rabbis (scribes) or experts in the law and could belong to either the sect of the Pharisees or that of the Sadducees. Normally, the two sects got along for purposes of governing the people, but they did have a mutual dislike for each other. The lawyer who spoke out in defense of the Pharisees (Luke 11:45), may, indeed, have been a Pharisee, but Jesus responded by pronouncing three woes upon the whole group of lawyers (Luke 11:46-52). So, this would have united both the Pharisees and the Sadducees against a common enemy. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 3, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Who Were the Lawyers?

LawyersThe lawyers or the “experts in the Law” told Jesus that his denunciation of the Pharisees also insulted them (Luke 11:45). Many lawyers were Pharisees, but not all. Some were Sadducees. The lawyers were the rabbis who discussed the interpretation of the Law, and their doctrines were later codified in what has come down to us as the Jerusalem Talmud and the Babylonian Talmud. These important Jewish works contain what is known as the Oral Law, or what the New Testament describes as the tradition of the elders (Matthew 15:2; Mark 7:3, 5). Jesus claimed that the lawyers or rabbis made the word of God void, because following their traditions contradicted what Moses wrote. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 1, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Who Were Jesus’ Accusers?

Accusers

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For about two and one half years Jesus had been publicly presenting himself as the Jews’ Messiah. While he never said in so many words, “I am the long awaited Messiah!” He did read a Messianic passage of Scripture in Nazareth, and immediately afterward say: “This day, is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears (Luke 4:21). He was rejected in Nazareth, but he operated afterward out of Capernaum and performed many miracles there, but the authorities in Galilee challenged his doctrine and even plotted how they might get rid of him (Luke 6:11; cf. Matthew 12:14; Mark 3:6). So, in Luke 9:51 Jesus set his face like a flint to ascend to Jerusalem and present himself as the Messiah there. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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A Scoffer’s Myth

Scoffers

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Peter spoke of the myths of the false teacher (2Peter 1:16) or scoffers (cf. 2Peter 3:1-3). It may surprise some believers that some of these myths that were used by the Biblical critics of the first century AD have been preserved in the New Testament. One is quite obvious and is found in Luke 20:27-33 where the Sadducees sought to test Jesus in an effort to refute the doctrine of the resurrection. These men were scoffers or Biblical critics, the forerunners of our modern critics who labor to show the untrustworthiness of Scripture by pointing to seemingly unreasonable sayings or contradictions in the text. Nevertheless, just as the Lord used Scripture to show the error of the Sadducees, we can do the same today, if we trust God to help us understand what the Scriptures say. Another, not so obvious myth is found in Luke 16. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Interest in John’s Baptism

John the Baptist - 4

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The Gospel writers tell us that there was a great interest in what John was doing. In fact, even Josephus speaks of his ministry and says some Jews reasoned that the later defeat of Herod Antipas’ army to Aretas, king of Arabia, was evidently due to God judgment upon him for his killing John.[1] So, John was a force to be reckoned with, at least according to Josephus, who records that Herod feared John might use his popularity to raise a rebellion against him. The Gospel accounts show John’s public ministry ended with his imprisonment, specifically on charges of John claiming Herod was living in sin, because he had married his brother, Philip’s, wife, Herodias (Luke 3:19-20). Herod probably had John beheaded within a year of his arrest. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 26, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Who Were the Generation of Vipers?

Corruption

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God sent John, the son of Zacharias, to prepare the people of Israel for the coming of Jesus, the Messiah. From the very beginning of Luke’s Gospel, we get the idea that something is wrong. Luke doesn’t come right out and say what’s wrong, but what he does say implies corruption, and his implications cannot be missed by Theophilus, the high priest, to whom Luke’s Gospel is addressed. Earlier, Luke alluded to the days of Samuel, the prophet, when the high priesthood was corrupt. The implication is that in John’s day it was no different. Nevertheless, one cannot openly accuse one’s leadership of wrongdoing during the 1st century AD and expect to live a long life. John accused Herod of committing adultery by taking his brother’s wife for himself, and John was beheaded not long afterward. Jesus openly confronted the Jewish leadership (Matthew 21:23-46) and was crucified within a week. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 19, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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