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Tag Archives: Sadducees

How Is the Messiah David’s Son?

Messiah - 1

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Jesus had just defeated the scholarly Sadducees in a verbal battle of wits. In doing so, he had caused the Pharisees to rejoice, in that Jesus had shown how the Law points to the resurrection, something the rabbis had heretofore been unable to do. Therefore, perhaps not to appear he supported this group over that of the Sadducees, Jesus asked the disciples of the Pharisees how their teachers (the rabbis / scribes – see Mark 13:35) taught the Messiah was David’s son (Matthew 22:41; Luke 20:41). Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on May 6, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Marrying and Giving in Marriage

Liverate Marriage

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I suppose there are skeptics or scoffers in every age. Atheist and for that matter even some Jews, if we were involved in a debate would scoff at the Second Coming of Christ. They tell us that the New Testament writers believed he would come during the first century AD,[1] even Jesus predicted he would return before that generation to which he preached past away (Matthew 24:34). And, you know what? They are correct, both the New Testament writers and Jesus claimed he would return in the first century AD. However, the premise of their argument depends entirely on Jesus coming in a physical body that everyone could see. Their whole argument is based upon a physical Kingdom and a physical Second Coming, as is preached by all three groups of futurist eschatology (premillennialism, postmillennialism and amillennialism). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 4, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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In Defense of the Resurrection

Defending the ResurrectionJesus began by telling the Sadducee intellectuals that they didn’t know the scriptures and, therefore, erred in their understanding (Matthew 22:29; Mark 12:24). However, Luke doesn’t mention this insult (Luke 20: 34-35)! Why not? No doubt, Luke doesn’t put the Sadducees in a bad light here or anywhere else in his Gospel, because it was Luke’s intention to give a copy of his narrative to Theophilus, the high priest at the time of his writing (37-40 AD), who was also a Sadducee. It doesn’t make sense to insult the man one hopes in influence to change his mind and stop the then current persecution of the Hellenist Jewish believers, which is exactly what Theophilus ended up doing (cf. Acts 9:31 – cir 39 AD). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 3, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Scoffers and Bearers of Myth

Liverate Marriage

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The Sadducees were next to question Jesus (Luke 20:27). They were the Judaism’s scoffers or mockers of the 1st century. They didn’t believe in the resurrection or spirits (angels – see Acts 23:8). The chief priests were members of this sect, as well as the lay nobility, some of this latter group populated the Sanhedrin with the Pharisees and chief priests. Sadducees (i.e. the chief priests and Judaism’s nobility) used myth or hypothetical stories in their debates with the Pharisees to put them in silly situations that mocked at their theology and would later do the same with believers in Christ (cf. 2Peter 3:3-7). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 1, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Sanhedrin

Sanhedrin

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In Luke 20:1-2 Jesus gets a visit from members of the Sanhedrin. There were many sanhedrins throughout Judea and Galilee. They were the local courts of the land, composed of three or twenty-three members,[1] populated by the Jewish leaders in each town. The chief court in Jerusalem, THE Sanhedrin, or the Supreme Court of the Jews, seems to have been composed of the three, twenty-three member courts at Jerusalem.[2] It was made up of Pharisees, Sadducees and Jewish elders (considered to be the Jewish nobility). The high priest would preside over the assembly as its president or nasi, i.e. prince (cf. cf. Numbers 11:16; ).[3] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Luke and Egyptian Folklore

Rich Man and Lazarus - 2

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It might be interesting to discuss the possible literary genre of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus. Some scholars believe its theme has been borrowed from Egyptian folklore. The problem with this idea is that Jesus would have no reason to use pagan literature to speak to the Jews, especially his disciples. Moreover, since there are obvious doctrinal issues with the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus, why would Jesus use gentile literature to teach anything about the Kingdom of God. On the other hand, if the Jewish authorities were already using this story, which **they** borrowed from Egyptian folklore in order to support their own worldviews (Titus 1:14; cf. 2Timothy 4:4), then Jesus would have good reason to use it, if he wanted to expose error in the doctrines of the Jewish authorities of his day. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 17, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Is Experience Better Evidence for Truth?

Evidence

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In the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus the rich man believes that a resurrection would alert his brethren to be forewarned of their fate, if they didn’t repent. Since the rich man’s sins aren’t mentioned, one sin that he may have in mind is the doctrine of the Sadducees that there was no life beyond the grave. They didn’t believe in a resurrection, so God’s blessings were to be received in one’s life on earth. There simply was nothing else. Therefore, the rich man thought his brethren needed to be warned that there was, indeed, an afterlife, and they needed to be aware of consequences of their actions. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 14, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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