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Tag Archives: Sadducees

Who Were Jesus’ Accusers?

Accusers

from Google Images

For about two and one half years Jesus had been publicly presenting himself as the Jews’ Messiah. While he never said in so many words, “I am the long awaited Messiah!” He did read a Messianic passage of Scripture in Nazareth, and immediately afterward say: “This day, is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears (Luke 4:21). He was rejected in Nazareth, but he operated afterward out of Capernaum and performed many miracles there, but the authorities in Galilee challenged his doctrine and even plotted how they might get rid of him (Luke 6:11; cf. Matthew 12:14; Mark 3:6). So, in Luke 9:51 Jesus set his face like a flint to ascend to Jerusalem and present himself as the Messiah there. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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A Scoffer’s Myth

Scoffers

from Google Images

Peter spoke of the myths of the false teacher (2Peter 1:16) or scoffers (cf. 2Peter 3:1-3). It may surprise some believers that some of these myths that were used by the Biblical critics of the first century AD have been preserved in the New Testament. One is quite obvious and is found in Luke 20:27-33 where the Sadducees sought to test Jesus in an effort to refute the doctrine of the resurrection. These men were scoffers or Biblical critics, the forerunners of our modern critics who labor to show the untrustworthiness of Scripture by pointing to seemingly unreasonable sayings or contradictions in the text. Nevertheless, just as the Lord used Scripture to show the error of the Sadducees, we can do the same today, if we trust God to help us understand what the Scriptures say. Another, not so obvious myth is found in Luke 16. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Interest in John’s Baptism

John the Baptist - 4

from Google Images

The Gospel writers tell us that there was a great interest in what John was doing. In fact, even Josephus speaks of his ministry and says some Jews reasoned that the later defeat of Herod Antipas’ army to Aretas, king of Arabia, was evidently due to God judgment upon him for his killing John.[1] So, John was a force to be reckoned with, at least according to Josephus, who records that Herod feared John might use his popularity to raise a rebellion against him. The Gospel accounts show John’s public ministry ended with his imprisonment, specifically on charges of John claiming Herod was living in sin, because he had married his brother, Philip’s, wife, Herodias (Luke 3:19-20). Herod probably had John beheaded within a year of his arrest. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 26, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Who Were the Generation of Vipers?

Corruption

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God sent John, the son of Zacharias, to prepare the people of Israel for the coming of Jesus, the Messiah. From the very beginning of Luke’s Gospel, we get the idea that something is wrong. Luke doesn’t come right out and say what’s wrong, but what he does say implies corruption, and his implications cannot be missed by Theophilus, the high priest, to whom Luke’s Gospel is addressed. Earlier, Luke alluded to the days of Samuel, the prophet, when the high priesthood was corrupt. The implication is that in John’s day it was no different. Nevertheless, one cannot openly accuse one’s leadership of wrongdoing during the 1st century AD and expect to live a long life. John accused Herod of committing adultery by taking his brother’s wife for himself, and John was beheaded not long afterward. Jesus openly confronted the Jewish leadership (Matthew 21:23-46) and was crucified within a week. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 19, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Paul’s Flight out of Jerusalem

Simply put, the fact that among the believing community only Paul had to flee from Jerusalem goes on to emphasize that he was, indeed, preaching something different from what the Apostles preached in Jesus’ name. But why did he have to flee to Caesarea and then to Tarsus (Acts 9:30)? Why couldn’t he simply flee to Galilee or Perea, just as Jesus did when he got into trouble with the Jerusalem authorities? If he did so, he may have been able to stay more in touch with the Apostles and eventually return to Jerusalem when the climate was more accommodating. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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The Great Persecution

I think we often read past Acts 8:1-4 just to get to Philip’s ministry to Samaria and the Ethiopian eunuch. Nevertheless, these four verses tell us a great deal, and are pretty much continued at Acts 11:19. It seems Luke placed Philip’s ministry to Samaria and the Ethiopian plus Saul’s conversion plus Peter’s going to the Roman centurion and his household right in the middle of this persecution, or to but it another way: between Acts 8:4 and Acts 11:19. It serves as a kind of parenthesis within the persecution and its information helps us to forget what is really taking place. Believers are dying for their faith. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 27, 2011 in Kingdom of God

 

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The Blunder of the Powerful

Few of us have ever been confronted by the world and threatened in such a manner as was done to the Apostles, Peter and John, in Acts 4. Luke places a special responsibility of blame upon the Sadducees, and the Annas family in particular, for the rejection of the Gospel message and for the persecution of the church later. In chapter 4 Luke highlights the position of the Sadducees by comparing this sect with the ordinary Jews. Later, in the next chapter he does the same when he contrasts the positions of the two ruling parties of Judaism—the Sadducees and the Pharisees (who had their own reasons for not embracing the new Jewish movement among them). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 7, 2011 in Acts of the Apostles

 

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