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Righteous Living and the Rich Fool

Rich Fool

from Google Images

While Jesus taught his disciples, a man in the crowd asked him to tell the man’s brother to share the inheritance with him (Luke 12:13). Often questions of one’s worth come at a time of death or when one is writing his last will and testament. Some may say this man is or was worth millions. Of another, some may conclude that he wasn’t worth much at all! Yet, of the two who is to say which one enjoyed life more? Who, by taking into account only the accumulation of tangible wealth, could say for certain which of the two lived a richer life. Wealth can buy many desirable things, but it can’t buy love, long life or peace. Even the poorest of men could enjoy all three of these, so one’s worth in this context cannot be accurately put into tangible terms. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on August 29, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Interrupting Jesus!

Interruptions

from Google Images

While Jesus was teaching his own disciples in the presence of an innumerable multitude (Luke 12:1), he was interrupted by a bystander (Luke 12:13). The man asked Jesus to arbitrate between him and his brother concerning an inheritance. Contextually, their father had died. The problem is, is the man’s question legitimate or has he been put up to it by one of the rabbis? The man’s question could be legitimate, because this thing was often done among the ancient Jews, hoping a rabbi could bring about a judicious settlement between quarreling members of a family. On the other hand, it is probably more likely that the man was a disciple of one of the rabbis, and the rabbi sought to discredit Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 27, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Living in the Presence of the Enemy

Enemies - 2We need to keep in mind that all the events described in chapters 11 and 12 of Luke’s Gospel occurred in the context of the disciples coming to Jesus and asking him to teach them to pray (Luke 11:1). The context of the model prayer is not to acquire our own personal needs, because our heavenly Father already knows about them, and, as a good Father, he will take care of them without our having to ask. Rather, the context of Jesus’ model prayer is our request for the Kingdom of God to come and for God to rule here as he does in heaven (Luke 11:2). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 13, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Gospel Cannot Be Hid

LeavenThe Lord warns us that we need to beware of hypocrisy. What we are within will be made manifest to others. It is impossible for any of us to hide our true character forever. Eventually, God will bring all things hidden out into the open. The heart of the hypocrite is open to the Lord, and believers are no different. Our hearts, for good or for bad, are open to him as well. The implication Luke 12:1-12 is that the inner realm is much stronger than that of the outer. We cannot hide who we are. In Matthew 10:27, it is the Jesus who spoke in darkness, and what he said had to be proclaimed in the light. In Luke 12:3, it is we who speak in the darkness, and God, for honor or dishonor, will bring that to light as well. What the Lord whispers in our ears will be made public, and what we whisper in the ear of others cannot be hid. It must be made public. There is a power at work here that we are unable to see, but we are able to witness its effect. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus Third Passover

Rejected Messiah

from Google Images

It is important for us to realize that Jesus at this time is not traveling to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51) in order to die there, as so many Bible commentaries suppose.[1] Rather, Jesus set his face as a flint to go to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51) in order to confront the religious authorities about his office as Messiah, and this happened to be the time of his third Passover of his public ministry. The Galilean Jewish authorities had already rejected Jesus as their Messiah (Luke 6:11; cf. Matthew 12:14, 23-24; Mark 3:22), and considered his claim to be demonic, or, put another way, evidence of insanity (Mark 3:21; cf. John 10:20). Nevertheless, Jerusalem hadn’t the opportunity to officially reject him, although they hadn’t shown any signs of receiving him as their Messiah up to this visit, either. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 8, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Who Were Jesus’ Accusers?

Accusers

from Google Images

For about two and one half years Jesus had been publicly presenting himself as the Jews’ Messiah. While he never said in so many words, “I am the long awaited Messiah!” He did read a Messianic passage of Scripture in Nazareth, and immediately afterward say: “This day, is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears (Luke 4:21). He was rejected in Nazareth, but he operated afterward out of Capernaum and performed many miracles there, but the authorities in Galilee challenged his doctrine and even plotted how they might get rid of him (Luke 6:11; cf. Matthew 12:14; Mark 3:6). So, in Luke 9:51 Jesus set his face like a flint to ascend to Jerusalem and present himself as the Messiah there. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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A Faithless and Wicked Generation

Faithless Generation

from Google Images

Obviously, a cursory read of any one of the Gospels leaves a lot unsaid that could be understood and help the reader to understand what Jesus said and did in its original context. Luke’s account of the young boy healed by Christ is no different. Many things await comparison with the other Gospel records, and even some matters can be gleaned by thinking about what is not said but could be implied by what is said. For example, the fact that the father brought his son to Jesus, might have been part of a conspiracy by the Jewish authorities at Jerusalem to expose Jesus as a fraud, and thereby destroy him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 30, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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