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Tag Archives: Second Coming

John’s Prologue

john's prologue

from Google Images

Understanding when the Apocalypse (the Book of Revelation) was written is very, very critical to one’s eschatology. After all, if it was written by John, late in the first century AD, as most scholars believe today, then there was no event at that time (90-100 AD) that would provide the framework into which we could place this prophecy. Therefore, we must look for its fulfillment after the first century AD. On the other hand, if the Book of Revelation was written earlier in the first century AD, during the lives of the Apostles, Peter and Paul, then this prophecy would fit very well within the framework of the Lord’s judgment upon Jerusalem cir. 66 – 70 AD! Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on January 17, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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The Apocalypse and the Transfiguration

transfiguration

from Google Images

What could the Book of Revelation possibly have in common with Jesus’ Transfiguration (Matthew 17:1-8; Mark 9:2-8; Luke 9:28-36)? This is a question I had before I heard a preacher[1] speak of it, but I have to tell you, it makes a lot of sense. What the Transfiguration does for the Apocalypse is to place it in a context that demands that the book was written prior to the Jews’ war with Rome cir. 66-70 AD. The context of the Apocalypse is the Day of the Lord, or the Coming of Jesus.[2] The context of the Transfiguration is the Day of the Lord, or the Lord’s parousia (G3952), according to Peter (2Peter 1:16-18)! Interestingly, I’ve never put Revelation 1:1 together with Matthew 17:1-8 and 2Peter 1:16-18, but you can see how they all fit together. They all speak of the Second Coming and, therefore, the Day of the Lord. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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The Coming of Jesus, the Messiah

apocalypse - 2

from Google Images

The last book of our Bible has become an enigma for nearly everyone who reads it, today. For example, Christian critic and biblical scholar, Elaine Pagels, claims the Apocalypse wasn’t even written by a Christian, as we understand the term. She says: “There’s no indication that (the author) read Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount or that he read the gospels or Paul’s letters… He doesn’t even say ‘Jesus died for your sins.’”[1] The problem with Ms. Pagels’ conclusion is that it is either uninformed or purposely dishonest. Actually, not one book in the New Covenant scriptures says: “Jesus died for your sins,” but Revelation 1:5 seems to come fairly close: “Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood.” Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 13, 2019 in Apocalypse, Book of Revelation

 

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What Does ‘This Generation’ Mean?

This Generation - 2.

from Google Images

The phrase this generation occurs sixteen times in the New Covenant scriptures.[1] The problem is that scholars don’t agree on how we should understand the term, especially at Matthew 24:34, where we are told that this generation shall not pass until all these things (i.e. the things Jesus described in Matthew 24:4-33) occur. Some scholars conclude this generation refers to the race of the Jews, meaning there will always be a Jewish people until the time of Jesus’ second coming.[2] Nevertheless, the word is never used in this sense in the whole of the New Covenant record. Other scholars conclude that this generation refers to the final generation before the end of the world.[3] However, such a conclusion hardly honors Jesus’ standing as a prophet, because, if there could be an end to the world, there **must** be a final generation that wouldn’t pass until the end occurred. So, how should we understand this phrase? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 23, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Judgment of the Nations

Sheep and GoatsNot long ago I had believed Matthew 25:31-46 depicted a time when Jesus would judge the whole world, i.e. every man and woman who ever lived. The problem with this understanding is, it removes it from the context of the rest of the Olivet Discourse. The Olivet Discourse concerns events that would transpire in the Apostles’ expected lifetimes. Remember, the Apostles were troubled over Jesus’ prediction that the Temple would be destroyed (Matthew 23:37-39; 24:1-2). Therefore, later, four of them approached Jesus privately and asked: when these things would take place, and what would be the sign of his coming and the end of the age (Matthew 24:3). For Jesus at this point to then speak of universal judgment, i.e. every man and woman who ever lived, snatches this parable out of the context of the first century AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Why Postpone the Wedding?

postponed (1)

from Google Images

Would you postpone your wedding, because the guests you invited refused to come? Why would anyone do that? Yet this is what futurists ask us to believe in order for them to maintain their doctrine of a future coming of Jesus and a future wedding banquet. The parables of Jesus are paradigmatic, that is, they provide the frame into which the eschatological painting found in the rest of the New Testament must fit. In other words, if our eschatology isn’t based upon what we find in Jesus’ parables, our eschatology is wrong, or unscriptural. Moreover, the parables, themselves, are based upon what was prophesied in the Old Testament. Therefore, the wedding that Jesus mentioned in The Parable of the Wedding Feast (Matthew 22:1-14) has its source in the Old Testament: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 21, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Is ‘Oops’ in God’s Vocabulary?

oops

from Google Images

I have been involved in an eschatological study of Jesus’ Parable of the Wicked Tenants (Matthew 21:33-46). In it Jesus tells a story of wicked vinedressers who kill the servants of the lord of the vine, finally slaying his son in an effort to steal the vine for themselves. The parable depicts the Jewish authorities as the wicked tenants or vinedressers, and Jesus as the son of the lord of the vine, and the lord is God and the vine is his Kingdom (Israel). Jesus’ point was the Kingdom would be taken from those wicked tenants (the Jewish authorities listening to Jesus) and given to a nation that would produce the fruits (Matthew 21:43), which clearly depicts a 70 AD fulfillment. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 14, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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