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The Parable of the Mustard Seed

mustard seed and birds

from Google Images (mustard)

It is commonly thought by Bible scholars, although not by all, that the Parable of the Mustard Seed (Luke 13:18) is about the spreading out of the Gospel, no doubt, because Jesus mentions the plant as a metaphor for the Kingdom of God. The problem with this understanding is context. Jesus uttered the parable in the presence of both his enemies and those who are normally impressed with what he says and does (Luke 13:14-17). Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on October 1, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Peter’s Great Confession

the-question

from Google Images

In Luke 9:20 we find that Peter claimed that Jesus was the “Christ of God!” This is the first time anyone has ever made that confession. Earlier the nameless multitudes claimed Jesus was the Prophet who should come (John 6:14), and earlier still even some of the disciples said Jesus was the Messiah (Christ). Peter’s brother, Andrew, told Peter he had found the Christ (John 1:41). About the same time Philip went to Nathanael to say he had found the one Moses said would come (John 1:45), and when Nathanael found Jesus he agreed (John 1:49). Yet, none of these were like Peter’s confession. Andrew repeated what John the Baptist had told him, and he, together with Philip and Nathanael were merely impressed with what Jesus said to them. They reacted to circumstance, but didn’t really think it all through in their hearts like Peter did. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 26, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jairus’ Heart

jairus-1

from Google Images

One may understand from the reading of the Parable of the Sower, that the people who have a heart for Jesus (their hearts = “the good ground” – Luke 8:8, 15) are people who are also strong in their faith. However, this doesn’t seem to be the case when one considers the meaning in the light of what occurs later in chapter eight of Luke. Who would consider a recently healed demoniac as someone having strong faith? Moreover, consider the woman with an issue of blood for twelve years. It seems her understanding bordered on the occult rather than the Scriptures, and once she was healed, Jesus had to cause her to come forward and admit what had happened to her. Only when she did this was she able to receive a better understanding of what had occurred to her. These are not incidents of great faith, but weak faith. Nevertheless, they do represents the hearts that Jesus calls good ground in the Parable of the Sower (Luke 8:8, 15). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Living Out the Parable of the Sower

sower

from Google Images

Luke tells us that the people gladly received Jesus when he returned and, in fact, were waiting for him (Luke 8:26, 40). If Jesus had been simply visiting towns along the coast of the Sea of Galilee, no one could have expected Jesus to return to their village. Therefore, Jesus must have returned to his home town, Capernaum. It is the only city on the coast of the lake that could have rightfully expected him to return. Knowing this, and understanding that folks came to Jesus out of every city (Luke 8:4), puts the timeline of these events during a Jewish festival, probably the Feast of Purim that occurred in the twelfth month of the Jewish calendar. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Fruitfulness of God’s Word

fertile-soil-2

from Google Images

In Luke 8:16 Jesus changes from a planting theme to the subject of light. Jesus used this theme previously in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:15). Luke shows that Jesus repeated such themes when they served his purpose in teaching his disciples. Here, Jesus tells us that light cannot be hid, and light in this context is the word of God (Luke 8:16; cf. Psalm 119:105; cf. 2Peter 1:12-21). While one might conclude that the light that cannot be hid is the believer (cf. Matthew 5:14), the context in Luke seems to indicate it is the word of God (cf. Luke 8:11). Up to this point Jesus had been speaking of the fruitfulness (or lack thereof) of the word of God in a man’s heart. I believe he continues to do so, as he changes the symbol to light. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Devil

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The name devil (diabolos – G1228) is defined as slanderer. The Scriptures also refer to the devil as the accuser of the brethren (Revelation 12:10). Jesus tells us that Judas Iscariot was a devil (John 6:70-71), implying that he was a false accuser or a slanderer. Jesus could have meant this to show Judas slandered his enemies, but Jesus may also be implying Judas was slandering Jesus in some manner. Perhaps when Judas was sent out to preach the Gospel (cf. Luke 9:1-2), he may have preached a messiah more to his liking (cf. John 12:34), than what Jesus told him to say. In any case, Jesus revealed in Luke 8:12 that it is the devil who removes the word of God (the ‘seed’ in the parable) from the hearts of men. This attaches a kind of omnipresence to a being other than God, unless it can be shown Jesus doesn’t mean to say an actual spirit being takes the word of God out of the hearts of men. Our modern theology seems to make the Devil, called Satan, into a kind of god who possesses God-like powers, but this is impossible. Only the Lord is God, and no one is able to oppose him.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 12, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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It’s a Matter of the Heart

fertile-soil-3

from Google Images

After delivering the Parable of the Sower, Jesus revealed privately to his disciples that the seed is the word of God (Luke 8:11), which is sown in a man’s heart (Luke 8:12, 15). The hearts of some men are described in Luke 8:5-8 in varying degrees of receptiveness to the word of God, which is what makes the hearts of men useful to the Kingdom of God. In Luke’s first example, he tells us that some men’s hearts are just too hard for spiritual life (Luke 8:5, 12). The hearts of these men are trodden down, as though their hearts had no value (Matthew 7:6; cf. Hebrews 10:29) The birds eat the seed deposited there, so the word of God is never permitted to take root so that these men might consider the will of God. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 10, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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