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Judgment Day

AD 70

from Google Images

In Luke 10:12 Jesus spoke of the day in which the Jews would be judged, and according to what he would later tell Annas, the high priest, in the final week of his public ministry (cf. Matthew 26:64), Jesus would be their Judge! In other words, Jesus spoke of the coming war of the Jews with Rome that would culminate in the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, and such a thing would be the loss of the Jews’ national status. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 2, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Dating Peter’s Death

from Google Images

from Google Images

Peter’s epistles speak of the persecution of his addressees (1Peter 1:6; 2:19-23; 4:13). Therefore, if Peter is the author of both First and Second Peter, then both epistles must have been written during a period of persecution of the Church, but not the persecution that took his own life. Early Christian records tell us that Peter died in Rome during the persecution begun there by Nero Caesar. This would place Peter’s death about 64 AD, during the persecution that erupted in Rome surrounding the fire that burnt that city for five days. Since Nero had committed suicide in July of 68 AD, Peter’s death must have certainly occurred before then, and the 64 AD date seems plausible, but there is more to consider. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 26, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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What Is the Wrath to Come?

Wrath to Com

from Google Images

In Luke 3:7 John the Baptist warned of the wrath to come. What is John referring to? The wrath to come is actually the coming wrath. That is, it is already present, coming continually upon the children of disobedience (Ephesians 2:2; 5:6; Colossians 3:6). The wrath itself is judgment (John 3:36; Romans 1:18; cf. Romans 8:1, 5). The particular judgment that John referred to concerned the mistreatment of the Jewish nation by the gentiles, which culminated in the Jewish war of 66-70 AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 21, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Lord Coming in Flesh

god-is-with-us

from Google Images

The first persecution of the Church that ended in death concerned how we understand God’s Presence in the world. In Acts 7 Stephen was killed by overly zealous Jews who could not tolerate the idea that God never intended us to understand his Presence locked into a fixed location – i.e. the Temple at Jerusalem. Rather he revealed himself to us as a mobile God who could be in Mesopotamia to call Abraham, in Egypt to call Moses or anywhere else in the world. Such an idea was completely foreign to rabbinical thought, but, once revealed, it couldn’t be expunged from a valid understanding. The New Testament theology of God’s Presence within man and traveling with him, wherever he goes, has its context in the Wilderness years of Israel’s history. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Gabriel’s Greeting to Mary

Mary -1

from Google Images

Many folks will say, and I agree, that one could read a particular Scripture many times, yet, in reading it once more we would find something we never saw before. This is no less true even now, as I consider Gabriel’s greeting to a young maiden in Nazareth to announce what we call the Virgin Birth. Luke tells us that in the 6th month of Elizabeth’s pregnancy (Luke 1:24, 26, 36) the angel, Gabriel (Luke 1:26-28; cf. verses 11 & 19), came to visit a young maiden named Mary. She was engaged to a man named Joseph, who was descended from King David, and she was a virgin (Luke 1:27). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Course of Abijah

Course of Abijah

from google Images

Luke tells us in Luke 1:5 that the officiating priest, Zacharias was of the course of Abia. Once the Temple was built by Solomon, the duties of the priests and Levites would have to change, because the whole idea of building a Temple of God in a fixed location at Jerusalem meant the mobile Tabernacle, which was packed up and carried from one place to another, would be replaced. Duties concerning how one served God with respect to where his Presence dwelt would of necessity change as well. Therefore, David organized the priests (and the Levites) into 24 courses (1Chronicles 24:1-31). Notice that the course of Abijah was the eighth of the priestly divisions (1Chronicles 24:10). Abijah in 1Chronicles 24:10 is the same course as Abia of Luke 1:5. Zacharias was officiating in the Temple according to the time when the eighth division served out its responsibility. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 12, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Our Abominable Value System

from Google Images

from Google Images

Some of the most puzzling events in the New Testament for me were the times (there were more than one) Jesus cast out the money changers from the Temple.[1] I wasn’t puzzled over what he did, but how and why the money changers were able to conduct their business within the Temple compound. It was done in the gentile sector, but the whole Temple area must have smelled like a stable, and what worshiper had privacy enough to be intimate with God in prayer in such a public place? It not only smelled badly, but was more similar to a noisy market than the House of God. What was going on? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 28, 2015 in Jesus

 

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