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Tag Archives: Temple

Judgment of the Nations

Sheep and GoatsNot long ago I had believed Matthew 25:31-46 depicted a time when Jesus would judge the whole world, i.e. every man and woman who ever lived. The problem with this understanding is, it removes it from the context of the rest of the Olivet Discourse. The Olivet Discourse concerns events that would transpire in the Apostles’ expected lifetimes. Remember, the Apostles were troubled over Jesus’ prediction that the Temple would be destroyed (Matthew 23:37-39; 24:1-2). Therefore, later, four of them approached Jesus privately and asked: when these things would take place, and what would be the sign of his coming and the end of the age (Matthew 24:3). For Jesus at this point to then speak of universal judgment, i.e. every man and woman who ever lived, snatches this parable out of the context of the first century AD. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on November 29, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Matthew 22 and Revelation

Lord Almighty Reigns

from Google Images

In the past few studies I have been demonstrating that The Parable of the Wedding Feast (Matthew 22:1-14) foretells the destruction of Jerusalem and the end of the Old Covenant. I have also been showing how Jesus’ eschatology was being drawn from the Old Testament prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea and Malachi. Moreover, when we compare the New Testament epistles with Jesus’ parables, we find a common eschatological theme, showing the coming of the Lord, God’s judgment upon Jerusalem and the Temple, the ending of the Old Covenant and the resurrection all occur in the first century, cir. 70 AD. In this study I hope to show, using the content of Matthew 22, that the very same themes run through the book of Revelation. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The Wedding and the New Creation

newcreation1

from Google Images

Once again I will be discussing The Parable of the Wedding Feast (Matthew 22:1-14), wherein Jesus told of a king who made a wedding for his son. He sent out his servants to tell the guests he had invited that everything was ready, so they should come to the wedding. However, the guests wouldn’t come, and they devalued the importance of the wedding and mistreated the king’s servants and killed them. When the king heard of what they had done, he sent out his armies and killed the evildoers and burnt their city. Upon doing this, he sent out his servants to invite everyone they found on the highways in order to have guests at the wedding. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 28, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The Rending of the Veil

Temple Veil

from Google Images

I wonder how one would explain the fact that, if Jesus’ crucifixion took place at either of the two most popular locations, how any of the Gospel writers could know that the veil of the Temple was torn from the top to the bottom. If the writers of the Gospel wrote only what they witnessed or what other disciples witnessed (cf. Luke 1:1-3), how was it known how the veil of the Temple was torn or even when it occurred on that day? After all, both popular crucifixion sites are found on the other side of the city and behind the Temple. The only possible location for the crucifixion to have taken place, and for the disciples to actually see what occurred in the Temple was east of the city on the top of Mount Olivet! Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 19, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Crucifixion and the Temple of God

Door

from Google Images

The Genesis account of the Garden of Eden, and the activity of Cain and Able portray an interesting comparison to the divisions of the Tabernacle in the wilderness and the Temple of of God at Jerusalem. For example, the Most Holy Place is equivalent to the place in the Garden where Adam and Eve met with the Lord (cf. Genesis 3:8), while the rest of the Garden, where Adam and Eve interacted with one another and satisfied themselves with the fruits thereof, would be equivalent to the Holy Place within the Tabernacle or the Temple. Outside the Garden was the Land of Eden, for the Garden was planted within Eden (Genesis 2:8). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 9, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Simon of Cyrene

Simon of Cyrene

from Google Images

I wonder if it is possible to know a story so well that one simply misses many of the details? I know I often come to see things differently even after many sessions of reading, discussion and study. Similar things are done inadvertently during ordinary conversation. We may be speaking with someone, but, without waiting for the full story, we jump to the wrong conclusion, only to be corrected by the speaker. Understanding becomes even more problematic when someone we trust tells us of his conclusion about what another friend has said, so, when speaking with the second friend, the blurred truth becomes even more difficult to correct. I believe this sort of thing often occurs when we read and discuss the Bible. We, no doubt, get the gist of the account, but the details that get us there are often taken for granted and obscured. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 31, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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No One Knows That Day and Hour

Day and Hour - 5

from Google Images

In the Olivet Prophecy and concerning his parousia (Matthew 24:3), Jesus told his disciples that no man knew that day and hour, not even the angels, but his Father only (Matthew 24:36). What does it mean, first of all, ‘that day and hour’? Was Jesus speaking of the night and day portions of a single day and a single 60-minute hour of a single day? I don’t think this was what he had in mind, nor do I believe the Apostles normally divided their day that closely. We do today, but I don’t think they did back then. They had three and four hour watches during the night, and the hour was important to the employer, and even for daily worship the hour was important, but normally speaking, they didn’t divide their day up into 24 one hour periods. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 27, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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