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Tag Archives: Temple

The Gospel v/s Dispensationalism

Dispensationalism

from Google Images

According to dispensationalists, the prophecy of the union of the two kingdoms of Judah and Israel, symbolized by uniting the two sticks in Ezekiel 37, and the New Covenant, as described in Jeremiah 31:31-34, has not been fulfilled, but will be fulfilled in the millennium. During that time, there would be a physical Temple in literal Jerusalem, and physical Temple worship, which includes animal sacrifices, would be in place. Physical circumcision would be commanded, and gentile nations would need to make pilgrimages to Jerusalem during the annual Feast Days (according to Zechariah 14). In fact, this would represent two different redemptive plans: one for Israel and the other for gentiles who believed the Gospel during the Gospel age, which by the time of the millennium, the Gospel age and apparently the Gospel, itself, would cease to exist: Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on June 4, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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A New Covenant with the House of Israel

New Covenant - 1

from Google Images

The predominant view of futurist eschatology is that Jesus absolutely must return to this earth and set up or establish a physical Kingdom of God, wherein he will reign as the Messiah in a visible, physical body on a physical throne from physical Jerusalem. I have been in recent months repudiating that point of view, saying that Jesus has already returned and has already established his Kingdom in 70 AD, when he returned in the clouds, as he claimed he would (Matthew 26:64), and judged Jerusalem and destroyed its Temple in the person of the Roman general, Titus, and his armies. Of course, such a ‘Second Coming’ was not visible with one’s eyes, but it was perceived, in that, the destruction of Jerusalem was the sign of Christ’s presence (Matthew 24:3, 30). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 30, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Paul and Ezekiel

Dwelling Place

from Google Images

In the past two studies on 70 AD eschatology I’ve been discussing Ezekiel 37 and the restoration of the two Houses of Israel. Ezekiel 37, remember, points to all those dry bones in the valley, and God says they are the whole house of Israel. We’ve seen that it really didn’t mean the whole House of Israel was in a literal grave. After all, there were many from both Judah and the ten northern tribes alive and in captivity. What Ezekiel was referring to was Israel was without hope, in that both houses had broken their covenant with God, so they were depicted as dead. I have been showing how the coming of Jesus, the Messiah, has ultimately breathed life into those dry bones, and he has restored them, i.e. united them into one nation once more, as was the case in the beginning under Moses and up to the time of Solomon. This was and is a spiritual work, not a physical one, and pointed to a spiritual Kingdom of God.
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Posted by on May 28, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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An Argument from Silence!

Argument from SilenceAny argument from silence is tenuous at best. However, under certain conditions such an argument can be significant. For example, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle built an entire argument around the silence of a dog during a murder in his book “The Adventure of Silver Blaze.” The dog’s silence was quite deafening! However, what about the silence in the scriptures concerning the physical Kingdom Jesus is said to have intended to set up at his Second Coming. Does the argument of silence work here? Is it great enough to show he intended to set up a spiritual Kingdom, not a physical one as most folks expected? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 9, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The Stone the Builders Rejected

Cornerstone - 1

from Google Images

In Luke 20:17 Jesus refers to himself as “the Stone that the builders rejected.” He is quoting from Psalm 118:22 and is, therefore, claiming the Psalm refers to him. Luke emphasizes ‘the Stone’ or Jesus in his record, but the other Synoptics quote Psalm 118:22-23, thus emphasizing “the LORD” (i.e. God, our Father) who has made the Stone the chief cornerstone (cf. Matthew 21:42; Mark 12:10-11). Jesus’ point was the he is THE Stone (Psalm 118:22; cf. Luke 20:17), and he derives his authority from YHWH the LORD (i.e. God – Psalm 118:23; cf. Matthew 21:42; Mark 12:10-11).[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Casting Out the Money-Changers

Cleansing the Temple

from Free Bible Images

Three times in four days Jesus cast out the money-changers who were conducting business inside the Temple walls. In doing so, we are told that he cleansed the Temple, which he had also done in the beginning of his ministry (cf. John 2:13-17). By the third time the Jewish authorities would have been beside themselves in anger and frustration, as Jesus cast out the money changers and those who bought and sold within the Temple complex. Yet, because the people hung upon Jesus’ every word (Luke 19:47-48), the Jewish authorities didn’t dare seize him. They were livid, but could do nothing in public (John 12:19; cf. Luke 22:52-53). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 5, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Significance of Each Entry

Triumphant Entry - 1

from Free Bible Images

In a previous study I showed that an analysis of all four Gospel narratives, as they pertain to Jesus entry into Jerusalem during his final week of public ministry, points to Jesus entering Jerusalem and the Temple on three different days. Moreover, if we take John 12:14 into consideration, these three entries occurred over the course of four days. It seems when Jesus went to Bethany, the following day was the Sabbath, because Jesus had to search for the donkey and its colt. The text says: “when he had found him” (John 12:14), meaning the colt wasn’t tied at a specific place, but allowed to run free for the Sabbath day. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 3, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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