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Author Archives: Eddie

About Eddie

I am a Christian. I am married to my lovely wife, Kay, for over 40 years. I have enjoyed growing old with her, and look forward to a few more years, if our Lord permits. I am also a father of two daughters, both are married to two wonderful men. My eldest daughter has two children-a girl and a boy, so I am also a grandfather! God has been so kind to let me see both of my daughters fulfilling their dreams while they follow Jesus. I retired from a telecommunications company in 2002, and have never looked back. I have found retirement much more fulfilling than living by another man's schedule. I enjoy studying the Scriptures, reading a good book, blogging, and discussing my faith with folks over the internet who like to discuss matters concerning Jesus. I am also a Sunday school teacher, and have been for over 15 years.

The Second Covenant

Ancient people used covenants to formalize agreements between parties, whether for political or economic or even social purposes. Usually such covenants were one of two main types: bilateral and unilateral. Bilateral covenants were ancient agreements negotiated between equals or at least each of the parties had input into the agreement, which defined their responsibilities to produce the desired result. The unilateral covenant was different in that it was not negotiated but dictated by the party of higher rank, such as a king or military general. The covenants God made with Abraham were unilateral covenants. Each time the text reveals that it was God who both initiated the covenant and dictated the conditions whereby Abraham would enjoy the promises God made to him. (Genesis 15:1-18; 17:1-14). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Abram and Sarai Renamed!

I often wondered what the big deal was in changing Abram’s name to Abraham, but if any of what I’m about to say is true, it is a big deal indeed. Genesis 17 begins with telling us that Abram was ninety years old when God visited him again. This means there was about 13 years of silence, or at least the text doesn’t mention other visits by God. Therefore, if 13 years is accurate, the silence was probably for the purpose of maturing Abram’s faith. Then suddenly God speaks: “I am the Almighty God; walk before me, and be perfect.” Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 1, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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The Blessing of Ishmael

In Genesis 16:7-11 we have recorded Hagar’s encounter with the Angel of the Lord. I believe this encounter, coupled with God’s blessing of Hagar’s child, Ishmael in Genesis 17:20, tell us something we may have overlooked in Church history. The idea is not specific but the strange blessing of Ishmael by God seems to parallel some of the most notable things in Church history, even up to our own modern era. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Faulting Abram Without Cause

About a decade has passed since God had called Abram and promised to make him a great nation (cp. Genesis 12:1-4; 16:3, 16). Although he had been reassured that his seed would be as innumerable as the stars (Genesis 15:5), Abram had yet to father his first son. Sarah’s infertility and advanced age (now about 75 years) convinced her and Abram that she would never bear the child of promise. Desperately wanting to see the Lord’s promise of a son come true, yet convinced that life’s circumstances stood in the way, they acted to take their circumstances out of God’s hands and help them along. What followed is a classic example of problems created when God’s children second guess Him and substitute their own agenda for His, although none of us would put it that way. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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How Shall I know?

Something seems awry. The text tells us that Abram believed God, and his belief was accounted to him as righteousness (Genesis 15:6). Then in Genesis 15:8 we are told that Abram asks God, yes, but “how shall I know that I’ll inherit?” Doesn’t this contradict what is said of Abram in verse-6? In a word: “No!” it does not. How can I say this? Well, if we try to honestly explain Abram’s question and at the same time agree that he believed God, then we must conclude that Abram desired an explanation. He believed, but he didn’t understand. The same Hebrew word translated “shall I know” in the KJV is translated teach five times and showed another five times in Scripture. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 5, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Questions and God’s Promise

God told Abram that he need not be afraid, which means that Abram was, indeed, afraid of something. Abram had just won this huge battle against all odds. He had seen firsthand the favor and power of God. What could he possibly have been afraid of? It is possible that Abram feared future military reprisals from Chedorlaomer and his allies. When the kings got home and started licking their wounds, perhaps they may have asked, “How did Abram’s little army beat up on us?” Abram may have won the battle, but had he won the war? This very question may have been running through his mind at this time. God may have promised Abram the land in Genesis 12:7 and 13:14-17, but there are still lots of bad guys living there. Therefore, the word of God to Abram, “I am a shield to you,” (Genesis 15:1) could be aimed at relieving his fear of future military conflict. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 1, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Abram in Victory

Abram was able to foil the ambitious plans of Chedorlaomer and the great men of the east. In the course of human events international political and economic struggles occur, but Abram didn’t concern himself in such matters. Rather, he concerned himself with the plan of God, and although God does use human events for the benefit of his people, God is not necessarily behind those events. Lot became caught up in the power struggle that developed over who would profit through the trade tariffs levied on goods traveling between Egypt and Mesopotamia. Lot had grown deeply involved in Sodom’s culture and was no longer viewed by outsiders as someone apart from that society. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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The Believer’s War

Abram learned of Lot’s capture from a man (Genesis 14:14) who had escaped from the returning victorious armies that had defeated Sodom and the other cities in the plane. It is plausible that this man was one of Lot’s servants, and he escaped while being taken back to Mesopotamia, and came to Abram at Mamre (Hebron), knowing that place had become Abram’s dwelling place after the incident that separated him and Lot (cp. Genesis 13:11-12, 18). We are told that Abram had a covenant with Mamre, Eshcol and Aner (Genesis 14:13), but Lot had allied himself with the rulers of Sodom as his sitting in the gate of Sodom in Genesis 19:1 implies.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 19, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Overcome by the World!

The land of Canaan was situated between two ancient empires: Egypt and Mesopotamia. Whoever controlled Canaan would maintain a monopoly on international trade or at least control how much of it went on. I find it interesting that the Middle East still maintains that position. Its oil reserves fuel the world’s commerce, and the price placed upon a barrel of oil could have great consequences, not only in international trade, but also how much commerce is conducted in any one nation! Something similar to this went on in Abram’s day and after him. The trade routes between Egypt and Mesopotamia ran through Canaan. Therefore, whoever controlled this land bridge between the two great continents grew rich by levying taxes or fees for the good going through the land. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 15, 2014 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Living in the World

The people of God are not called to leave the world but to keep from being conformed to this world’s image of how one should be like (cp. Romans 12:2 & 1Corinthians 5:9-10). In other words, we are called to be sojourners in this world, in the sense that we don’t embrace it as our home. Rather we look to the promise of God for a world yet to be, whose builder is God, himself (Hebrews 11:8-10). So, what does all this mean? If we are not to consider this world our home, how then should we live? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 1, 2013 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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The Wilderness Experience

God didn’t call Abram to be part of the work or empire of someone else. He called Abram to set the pace for those who would follow him. He was to become the father of his own nation, and later the father of those who believe. He couldn’t do this if he was merely an important man at the gates of Ur, and neither could he attain this stature as the favored brother-in-law of Pharaoh. Abram was called not to follow in the paths of others, but to blaze a path of his own through the wilderness of the will of God. This is not the wide way that many use to seek God, but the difficult and narrow way that few find. The few who do are adventurers who are not comfortable doing as others do, nor are they apt to buckle under the pressure of their peers. Rather, they are at their best simply submitting to that call of God and stepping out into the unknown, simply because it is a great adventure to be in the will of God. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 27, 2013 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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The Call of the World

Sometime after Abram worshiped God at Bethel, he went down into Egypt, because there was famine in the land of Canaan. Every commentary I consulted criticizes Abram for doing so, yet we have no proof that Abram did not consult God before going, nor do we have any proof that, even if he hadn’t, that he sinned or made a mistake in doing so. What would sin be like without the law of God? According to Romans 5:13, God wouldn’t have faulted Abram, even if he had sinned. So, why should we find fault? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2013 in Abraham, famine

 

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The Call of God

The basis of Abram’s call was land, protection and a great name (Genesis 12:1-3). Perhaps Abram understood his call from God as a call to greatness. He may have thought he and his descendents would become the greatest nation, perhaps the greatest empire the world would ever know. Certainly this would later be the Jewish understanding under their Messianic King. But, what was God’s understanding of Abram’s arrival in Canaan? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 20, 2013 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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Abram’s Call

We find Abram first in the land of Mesopotamia in Ur, living with his father. He has a wife named Sarai, but no children (Genesis 11:26-30). According to the text the whole family left for the land of Canaan, not saying why, but stopped at Haran and stayed there. If it weren’t for Stephen in Acts 7:2-4, we might believe God first called Abram while he dwelt in Haran (Genesis 12:1-4). But, Stephen claimed that the call at Haran was God’s second call to Abram; the first was while he dwelt in Ur! How should we understand this? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 17, 2013 in Abraham, Walking with God

 

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The Testimony of Noah

(From Google Images)

(From Google Images)

If we are trying to be honest about how the Bible interprets itself, then certainly a “high hill” like Mount Olives would conclude a global flood was necessary, if it were indeed covered with water. Moreover, the testimonies of both Jesus and Peter in the New Testament seem to point to the global nature of the flood, since it is being compared with the future prospect of Jesus’ judgment over the whole world. So, ‘honesty’ plays a part in how we view what the Bible says about the events which it describes. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on November 13, 2013 in Genesis Flood, Noahic Flood

 

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