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Tag Archives: Jewish authorities

Martyr Vindication

Judgment Day - 2

from Google Images

In my most recent study, I mentioned The Parable of the Wicked Tenants (Matthew 21:33-46). According to that parable, the authorities taking care of (governing) the vine (the Lord’s heritage or his people) were responsible for killing the servants (prophets) of the lord of the vineyard (the God of Israel), and for which they would be eventually judged (Matthew 21:40, 43). So, in this parable Jesus introduced a common theme found throughout the New Testament, and that is the theme of the vindication of the martyrs. Later, Jesus would accuse the Jewish authorities of being guilty of all of the blood of all of the righteous from Able (Genesis 4) to Zacharias (2Chronicles 24:20-22).[1] In other words they were guilty of all of the righteous blood that had been shed under the Old Testament (Matthew 23:35). Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on October 7, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Parable of the Wicked Tenants

Fruit of the VineDays before he was crucified, Jesus told a parable in the presence of the Jewish authorities, which told of a man who owned a vineyard and leased it out to tenants. When it was near the time for the fruit to be ripe, he sent servants to receive his portion of the fruits. However, the tenants mistreated them, beating some and killing others. The master of vineyard then decided to send his son, believing the tenants would respect him, but when those wicked men realized the son had come, they decided to kill him and steal the vineyard for themselves (cf. Matthew 21:33-39). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 4, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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The Good Thief

Good Thief

from Google Images

Luke mentions that one of the criminals taunted Jesus, demanding him to save himself and them who were crucified with him (Luke 23:39). The second criminal, however, rebuked the first, telling him he had no fear of God, before whom they both were coming to be judged (Luke 23:40). The second man admitted to his guilt, saying that both his and the other man’s judgment fit the crimes they committed (Luke 23:41). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 14, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Unbelief and Mocking Jesus

Unbelief

from Google Images

For practical purposes the Romans needed an accusation to charge Jesus in order to crucify him, because such a thing would become a matter of public record. In the second century AD Justin Martyr, while addressing the Emperor, Pius, mentioned that proof of what he said could be obtained from the Acts of Pilate,[1] something that hardly could be so, if Pilate wasn’t required to record the reasons for the executions he commanded. Therefore, Pilate’s official verdict was: Jesus of Nazareth was the King of the Jews—a political crime, something for which he had earlier found him innocent. Nevertheless, he could hardly mention in a public record that he had executed Jesus for claiming to be the Son of God, a religious crime, according to the Jews (John 19:7, 13-16), but a matter of harmless superstition, according to Rome (cf. Acts 25:18-20). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 12, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Pilate’s Verdict of Crucifixion

Pilate

from Google Images

It is reasonable that Pilate would assume the chief priests and the people would desire Jesus’ release instead of Barabbas, because the latter was really guilty of the charges the authorities levied falsely against Jesus. Pilate knew the high priests understood Jesus wasn’t really guilty of the charges they made against him, so why wouldn’t they reject one who was really guilty of the accusations they made against Jesus? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 29, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Preaching to Closed Minds

Closed Mind

from Google Images

Presently, I am involved in a study of Jesus’ parables, as they pertain to the last days. We need to keep in mind that the scriptures say that God spoke to mankind at various times and through a great many different people, both small and great. However, in the last days he sent Jesus (Hebrews 1:1-2), and through Jesus, the Son of God, the word of God has come to us. One of the very first things Jesus made clear to us is that his words could be understood only by those who have ears to hear (Matthew 13:9). This doesn’t mean that the word of God is hidden, but it does tell us that Jesus doesn’t intend to disturb the spiritual blindness that men impose upon themselves by rejecting Jesus, in order to embrace what they’ve always been taught by folks with a diploma (viz. Matthew 12:23-24). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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The Strong Delusion of False Doctrine!

Stron Delusion

from Google Images

I have just embarked on a study of the eschatology of Jesus’ parables, and have been currently involved in a study of Jesus’ first parable, The Parable of the Sower in Matthew 13. I have demonstrated that the reason Jesus spoke to the people in parables, and without a parable he did not speak to them (Matthew 13:34), was so he wouldn’t disturb their hardheartedness (Matthew 13:11). In other words, they had already closed their minds to the truth about the Kingdom of God. They wanted a kingdom, alright, but they wanted the kingdom their way, not in the manner Jesus presented it (cf. John 12:34). They wanted a physical kingdom with a physical king, reigning in physical Jerusalem (cf. 1Samuel 8:4-7). That is not the Kingdom of God (cf. Luke 17:20-21). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 25, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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