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Apocalyptic Signs

Signs of the End

from Google Images

According to Luke, there would be heavenly signs, pertaining to the sun, moon and stars before the time of the end (Luke 21:25). Both Matthew and Mark wrote that the sun would be darkened, and the moon wouldn’t give its light, and the stars shall fall from heaven (Matthew 24:29; Mark 13:24-25), but if the sun withheld its light, the moon wouldn’t be able to shine, because it reflects the sun’s light. Moreover, if even one star fell from heaven to the earth, the earth and everyone on it would be destroyed. So, this couldn’t be literally true, but, rather, is apocalyptic language describing events that would occur near the time of the end. Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on May 31, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Signs of the End

Sign of the End

from Google Images

According to Luke’s record, the very first sign Jesus offered, showing the end was near was Jerusalem would be surrounded by armies (Luke 21:20). Nothing before that time, whether heavenly signs or wars, persecution or other kinds of trouble, pointed to the time of the end, which is the coming of Christ. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 27, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Value of the Believer’s Persecution

Good Example = 1

from Google Images

When Jesus foretold the coming persecution of his disciples, he said that it would turn out to the advantage of the Gospel. They would be able to testify to people who wouldn’t normally hear the Gospel. They would testify of Jesus before the authorities of the land, and before governors and kings (Luke 21:12-13; cf. Acts 24:7-10, 24-25; 25:9-13; 26:1). Moreover, their testimony would not be theirs, though it came from their mouths. Rather, Jesus, himself, would give them the words they needed to say, and once said, their enemies wouldn’t be able to legitimately argue against them (Luke 21:14-15; cf. Acts 25:9-12, 23-26; 26:32). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 24, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Judging First Century AD Babylon

Song of Moses - 4

from Google Images

When I was a premillennialist, I didn’t consider it all that important to know when Jesus would return, because, after all, no one could know the “day or the hour” (Matthew 24:36), and I was repulsed by the never-ending line of prophet wannabes in our modern era, who were so willing (for a price) to tell others when Jesus would return. Therefore, I usually stayed away from anything that dealt with eschatology. The last days can’t be known, so I busied myself doing what I could do, today, hoping that in some way what I did was pleasing to the Lord. However, all this has changed since the summer of 2017. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 9, 2018 in AD 70 Eschatology

 

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The Context of Matthew 16

Song of Moses - 2

from Google Images

Presently I am involved in an in-depth study of two verses: Matthew 16:27-28. I have chosen to do this, because it has come to my attention that the whole of the futurists’ argument for a Second Coming of Christ—in our future—hangs upon their determined effort to separate verse-27 from verse-28 by at least 2000 years. This is both contextually and grammatically invalid. Moreover, it hasn’t one iota of foundation elsewhere in the word of God, either in the New Testament or in the Old Testament prophecies. The gap theory (as I call it) has everything to do with eisegesis and nothing to do with exegesis. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 7, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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Hatred Toward Jesus and the Publicans

Tax Collector - 1

from Google Images

As far as the collection of taxes was concerned, the official responsible to Rome during the time of Jesus, would have been Herod Antipas for Galilee and Peraea. Matthew would have been one of Herod’s agents. In matters dealing with Judea and Samaria, the official agent responsible to Rome for collecting taxes would have been either Pilate or the president of Syria, and Zacchaeus would have been one of his agents. It seems, however, that the text places a greater responsibility upon Zacchaeus than upon Matthew, who may have been responsible for only a specific location in or near Capernaum. Zacchaeus, on the other hand, seems to have been the taxing authority in Jericho, and, no doubt, he had other taxing agents working under his authority. These agents would have been responsible to him, but he was responsible to the Roman authority accountable for collecting taxes for Rome. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Vindication of the Righteous

Great Harlot

from Google Images

In recent weeks I’ve been involved in a study of Matthew 16:27-28, laboring to show there is not a gap of cir. 2000 years or more between the verses. I have proved from a literary point of view that verse-27 is inextricably connected to the context of vindicating Jesus’ suffering and that of his disciples (Matthew 16:21 and following). I have also proved from a literary standpoint that verse-28 was used by Jesus to emphasize what he claimed in verse-27. So, a gap between the verses is simply impossible contextually speaking. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 5, 2018 in 70 AD Eschatology

 

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