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Plots and Schemes Against Jesus

Herod Antipas - 1

Herod Antipas – from Google Images

If we consider Luke 23:8 and apply it to what we are told in Luke 13:31, Herod may have been interested in seeing Jesus, but he doesn’t seem to be actively seeking his life. This doesn’t mean Jesus was never in danger from Herod Antipas, because Jesus may have used the close proximity of Herod Philip’s territory to Capernaum as a useful place of escape from time to time, when the political interest of Herod Antipas was stirred (cf. Luke 9:9-10). Nevertheless, there doesn’t seem to be a real  occasion in Luke 13 whereby Herod would naturally think (without being convinced by others) that Jesus was a political threat.

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Posted by on October 19, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Eschatology of Luke 13

Table Set for SederIt is interesting that Jesus mentions Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in Luke 13:28. Notice that Jesus also places all of the prophets with them, and all, that is, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob with all of the prophets of the Old Testament would sit down in the Kingdom of God. But, when would this occur? Was Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and all of the prophets already in the Kingdom of God at the time when Jesus preached to the Jews in Luke 13? It would not appear so, because Daniel was a prophet, and he was told to go his way, and he would rest (i.e. lay dead) until the end of days (age). At that time, i.e. at the end of days (or the end of the age), he would arise (Daniel 12:13). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Line Begins at the Rear!

backwards-kingdom

from Google Images

Jesus said that the many (the nation) who come and knock claim that they have eaten and drunk in his presence, i.e. in the presence of the master of the house, and he had taught in their streets (Luke 13:26). However, the context of the parable shows they were praying to God to act on their behalf. They still didn’t believe Jesus was the Messiah, and they didn’t realize the very God whom they claimed to worship was the very one who visited them in the person of Jesus 40 years prior to their request at the time of the Jewish war with Rome. They claimed they had “eaten and drunk in his presence” i.e. they worshiped him in the language of the Temple sacrifices. They claimed he (God) taught in their streets – i.e. the Torah was read in the synagogues each Sabbath and Holy Day. They claimed they worshiped him and listened to and obeyed his words, and on this basis they made their request: “open to us” i.e. act on our behalf. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 15, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Gospel of the Closed Door

Closed Door

from Google Images

If we compare Luke 13:25 with Matthew 10:25, we should be able to see that Jesus is the master of the house in the parable, and that it is he who closes the door after he is risen up (Luke 13:25). So, understanding what Jesus refuses to do for the many is necessary to understanding the meaning of saved in John 10:9 and Luke 13:23, because certainly the rabbi who asked Jesus the question didn’t believe he needed to be saved from his sins. He believed this was provided for through the Temple sacrifices. Moreover, sin is never mentioned by Jesus or anyone else in either Luke 13 or John 10. So, what does Jesus mean by saved in John 10:9, and is he speaking of the same thing that the rabbi has in mind in Luke 13:23? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Striving at the Gate of the Kingdom

Straight Gate

from Google Images

In Luke 13:23 Jesus was questioned by a rabbi concerning who and how many would populate the Kingdom of God. Jesus replied to the question with the parable of the straight gate (Luke 13:24-30). It is not that Jesus tries to avoid answering the question put to him, but, rather the rabbi’s question simply isn’t a valid one. The rabbi assumes the question of entering the Kingdom of God can be addressed as an either /or proposition. It is similar to the question: “Do you still beat your wife?” How does one answer that question, if one never beat or abused his wife? If he says “No!” his answer implies that he at one time beat his wife. If he says “Yes!” he agrees outright that he beat his wife. A person who has never beat or abused his wife cannot answer the question according to its content, because the question isn’t valid. It begins with a presumption that isn’t true. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 10, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Are There Few to Be Saved?

Question

from Google Images

Luke tells us that a person in the crowd asked Jesus a question (Luke 13:23). Most commentaries treat the question as legitimate, some even concluding that it is a question many ask even today. However, was the question as innocent as most commentaries make it seem? I have my doubts. It seems to me that the person who questions Jesus in Luke 13:23 is either a rabbi or one of the rabbi’s disciples. I believe he is probably baiting Jesus for a debate of sorts or in some manner seeking to discredit him. This was a question often debated among scholars of Jesus’ day, but as we shall see it precludes a direct or simple answer from Jesus, because it lacks a basic understanding of the Scriptures. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 8, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Jesus’ Next Journey to Jerusalem

Hanakkuh

from Google Images

Many Biblical scholars believe Jesus’ final journey to Jerusalem began in Luke 9:51. However, in order to maintain this idea, they have to conclude that Luke either uses about nine and one half chapters to show Jesus wandering aimlessly all over the countryside, zigzagging all the way to Jerusalem, and even reversing course to return to Galilee (cf. Luke 17:11), or he places Jesus’ movements in a hodgepodge of seemingly unrelated incidents that took place in various parts of Palestine, having no perceived order in them at all. It is astonishing for me to see how far one will go in order to protect a favorite idea from being disproved, or, perhaps it may be better to say, some scholars have embraced the idea for so long that they believe it must be supported in the Scriptures somewhere. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 5, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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