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Christ’s Divine Power

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Peter claims the believer has been given all things pertaining to life and godliness through “divine power” (2Peter 1:3), but is Peter referring to the Father’s power or that of Jesus? In 1Peter 1:1 Peter writes “…our God and Savior, Jesus Christ.” Then in verse-2 he again refers to Jesus with “…the knowledge of God, even Jesus our Lord.” The natural implication of the word divine in 1Peter 1:3 points to Jesus, i.e. Jesus’ divine power. It seems out of place, if Peter intends for us to understand the Father, because up to this point he is writing only of Jesus—our God and Savior and our knowledge of him. Why insert divine in reference to God (the Father)? It wasn’t worshipers of God who were being attacked, but worshipers of Jesus. Knowing Jesus as God was an astonishing revelation in the first century, and the mention of divine in verse-3 compliments Peter’s mention of our God and Savior in the first two verses of his epistle. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2017 in Epistles of Peter, Gospel of Luke

 

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Feeding the 5000

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When the people realized Jesus had left Capernaum, they followed him from the shoreline (Luke 9:11). Mark even tells us that at least some of the people were able to reach Bethsaida before Jesus (Mark 6:33-34). When he went ashore and found the people, Jesus had compassion upon them and received them and preached the Kingdom to them and healed many of their diseases (Luke 9:11; Mark 6:34). As the day drew on, however, the Apostles wanted Jesus to send the people away, because there was no food readily available at that place (Luke 9:12). It was a deserted area, probably used for grazing sheep or cattle. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 23, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Is it Simon or Simeon?

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Some ancient manuscripts of Peter’s second epistle have the Hebrew pronunciation, Simeon (συμεων – G4826), at 2Peter 1:1, while others have the Greek pronunciation, Simon (σιμων – G4613). Apparently, a later copyist changed Peter’s given name at 2Peter 1:1 to what he thought it should be. Throughout the Gospel narratives Peter’s given name is recorded as Simon, or the Greek pronunciation of his name. Probably, the copyist originally changed what Peter wrote at 2Peter 1:1 from συμεων (G4826) to σιμων (G4613), rather than the other way around. I can see no logical reason anyone would change how Peter’s name is written in the Gospels to agree with how his name is written at Acts 15:14, which is the only other place in the New Testament where Peter’s given name is written according to its Hebrew pronunciation. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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When Herod Became Aware of Jesus

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While the Apostles were going through at least part of the region of Galilee, and perhaps Peraea, preaching the Gospel of the Kingdom and doing miracles of healing and casting out demons, they caused quite a commotion. Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of that region, received reports concerning what occurred. If Jesus was unknown to Herod prior to the Apostles’ expedition, he certainly became aware of Jesus at this time, due to the fuss that was raised by the people in his jurisdiction, as that commotion pertained to the Apostles’ ministry among them (Luke 9:7). This is the same Herod who beheaded John the Baptist, and it is also he to whom Jesus was sent by Pilate on the day Jesus was crucified (Luke 22:6-7). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Faith of the Servant of Jesus

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Second Peter seems to mark the end of an era—the end of the Apostolic Church. Peter mentions that his death was imminent (2Peter 1:14), so his second letter takes the genre of a final testimony, telling his readers what they should keep in mind, as they face the persecution that has come upon them. For this reason 2Peter has been compared with Paul’s 2Timothy, where both warn about the apostasy that should follow their deaths, and to look for the judgment that would follow at the coming of Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in Epistles of Peter, Gospel of Luke

 

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The Dilemma of Authority

authority-3Have you ever really considered the dilemma of authority from the point of view of this world’s leaders. An ancient example would serve our purpose here. The name Herod means “hero like,” and history shows that he desired to be known as a great benefactor, both of the people and other world leaders. Most civil authorities today would desire the same thing. Think about the campaign promises politicians make before they are elected to office. They may not want to put forth the effort, but they would like to leave behind a legacy that would show they were wonderful at what they did (cf. Genesis 6:4). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 19, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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An Overview of Second Peter

2peter-overviewIn his second epistle Peter identifies himself as Simeon Peter,[1] using the Hebrew pronunciation of his name. He must have written this epistle before the Nero persecution of 64 AD, when tradition claims both he and Paul were executed as martyrs for Christ. In such a case, the timeline for Peter’s second epistle would be during Paul’s imprisonment or from cir. 56 AD to 64 AD. Most likely, however, Peter wrote it sometime after James’ death, which occurred cir. 62 AD. All things considered, it probably dates between 62 and 64 AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2017 in Epistles of Peter, Gospel of Luke

 

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