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Tag Archives: High Priest

Folks Tend to Believe False Teachers

False Teachers - 1

from Google Images

In the second chapter of his second epistle Peter began to tell of the prophesied false teachers. Like the false prophets of the Old Testament, they took their place in the assembly of God claiming to represent him, but, instead, they preached the dreams and desires of men. The prophets of old prophesied peace when they should have sounded out an alarm. They claimed to speak for the Lord, but they spoke out of the imagination of their own hearts (Jeremiah 23:15-16). Had they stood in the council of the Lord, pondering his word, they would have been equipped to turn God’s people from evil (Jeremiah 23:21-22). Rather, they invented stories, claiming disaster wouldn’t come (Jeremiah 23:25-27) and the people hardened their hearts and continued in their evil ways. Similarly, Peter warned of teachers of his own day who sought to turn the hearts and minds of believers away from the Lord, changing Scripture into something God never intended to say. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Context of Suffering for Christ

enduranceThe idea of suffering comes with a mixed bag of beliefs or practices that one has gotten and retained from being taught as a child and growing up in traditions coming from society. For example, if one has given himself over to be an athlete, he might have heard it said: “It isn’t working unless it hurts!” That is, if one is really interested in the prize, one must endure suffering along the way. This, of course, is also the goal of military discipline. So, suffering, although negative in tone, is often pursued in order to gain a desired positive goal. Jesus had a goal in mind, and he knew suffering was the only path to take in order to achieve that end. Therefore, he embraced the way of the cross, not because he enjoyed suffering, but because it was the only way of attaining the end for which he was born (John 18:37; cf. Luke 12:50; 22:15). The believer is called to follow Christ and, according to Peter, suffering has its place in the believer’s way of life. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 6, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Blessing Evildoers

love-your-enemies

from Google Images

It goes without saying that Peter isn’t trying to end his epistle in 1Peter 3:8, so what does he mean with the word: Finally…? He must be concluding an argument he had begun previously, so knowing where to look seems profitable at this point to our understanding his epistle. Elsewhere, Peter mentioned that his readers had been undergoing a great trial of their faith (1Peter 1:6-7). I had earlier argued that since this trial had come to five Roman provinces at the same time (cf. 1Peter 1:1), it must have a single source. Moreover, that source must have had enough authority or influence to produce trouble for believers in Jesus over the whole of Asia Minor. Finally, since such a trial or persecution didn’t come from the Emperor, Nero (for then the trouble would have been a bloody persecution as occurred later at Rome), the only other authority who had such commanding influence to affect so many believers in Christ was Annas, the high priest at Jerusalem.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 26, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Persecution in Asia Minor

from Google Images

from Google Images

In my two previous blogposts regarding First and Second Peter, I have argued that Peter, the apostle of Jesus, was the author of both epistles. Moreover, the epistles had to have been written sometime before the persecution that developed surrounding the fire that burnt much of Rome in 64 AD. Therefore, the persecution that Peter mentions, occurring in the five Roman provinces of Asia Minor, must be a different persecution than that begun by Nero at Rome. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 28, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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What Is the Wrath to Come?

Wrath to Com

from Google Images

In Luke 3:7 John the Baptist warned of the wrath to come. What is John referring to? The wrath to come is actually the coming wrath. That is, it is already present, coming continually upon the children of disobedience (Ephesians 2:2; 5:6; Colossians 3:6). The wrath itself is judgment (John 3:36; Romans 1:18; cf. Romans 8:1, 5). The particular judgment that John referred to concerned the mistreatment of the Jewish nation by the gentiles, which culminated in the Jewish war of 66-70 AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 21, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Who Were the Generation of Vipers?

Corruption

from Google Images

God sent John, the son of Zacharias, to prepare the people of Israel for the coming of Jesus, the Messiah. From the very beginning of Luke’s Gospel, we get the idea that something is wrong. Luke doesn’t come right out and say what’s wrong, but what he does say implies corruption, and his implications cannot be missed by Theophilus, the high priest, to whom Luke’s Gospel is addressed. Earlier, Luke alluded to the days of Samuel, the prophet, when the high priesthood was corrupt. The implication is that in John’s day it was no different. Nevertheless, one cannot openly accuse one’s leadership of wrongdoing during the 1st century AD and expect to live a long life. John accused Herod of committing adultery by taking his brother’s wife for himself, and John was beheaded not long afterward. Jesus openly confronted the Jewish leadership (Matthew 21:23-46) and was crucified within a week. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 19, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus and Anna, the Prophetess

Anna the prophetess

from Google Images

While Simeon was still testifying about Jesus, Luke says a prophetess named Anna (Hannah) of the tribe of Asher, who lived in Jerusalem entered the Temple compound (Luke 2:36-38). Why would he write what amounts to three verses, describing a widow of about eighty-four years of age, who had been married for only seven years when she was very young? He uses two verses to describe her, only to say that she gave thanks (presumably over what Simeon had said) and spoke of Jesus to anyone who looked forward to the coming of the Messiah (Luke 2:38). Why was this important enough for Luke to mention it to Theophilus (Luke 1:3), as an apologetic to support the fact that Jesus was the Messiah? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 3, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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