RSS

Tag Archives: John the Baptist

The Parable of the Evil Spirit

Butterflies

from Google Images

In Luke 11:24-28 Jesus offers his listeners a parable about an evil spirit in an effort to unveil what was at stake for the Jewish nation, if they didn’t receive him as their Messiah. First of all, there isn’t a single example in the Bible where a demoniac was healed but, afterward, became possessed again. Therefore, we need to ask if Jesus’ words have another meaning. Secondly, we need to remember that Jews in the first century thought and spoke differently than did gentiles of the same period. Jews would think and speak in pictures, but gentiles more analytically. For example, a gentile might have claimed Caesar was a great leader, but the Jews would have called David a great shepherd. A gentile might refer to a good man as someone of strong moral character, but an ancient Jew might say he was as a tree planted by the riverside, whose leaves didn’t wither (cf. Psalm 1:3). Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 6, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Feeding the 5000

miracle-feeding-5000

from Google Images

When the people realized Jesus had left Capernaum, they followed him from the shoreline (Luke 9:11). Mark even tells us that at least some of the people were able to reach Bethsaida before Jesus (Mark 6:33-34). When he went ashore and found the people, Jesus had compassion upon them and received them and preached the Kingdom to them and healed many of their diseases (Luke 9:11; Mark 6:34). As the day drew on, however, the Apostles wanted Jesus to send the people away, because there was no food readily available at that place (Luke 9:12). It was a deserted area, probably used for grazing sheep or cattle. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 23, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

When Herod Became Aware of Jesus

herod-antipas

from Google Images

While the Apostles were going through at least part of the region of Galilee, and perhaps Peraea, preaching the Gospel of the Kingdom and doing miracles of healing and casting out demons, they caused quite a commotion. Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of that region, received reports concerning what occurred. If Jesus was unknown to Herod prior to the Apostles’ expedition, he certainly became aware of Jesus at this time, due to the fuss that was raised by the people in his jurisdiction, as that commotion pertained to the Apostles’ ministry among them (Luke 9:7). This is the same Herod who beheaded John the Baptist, and it is also he to whom Jesus was sent by Pilate on the day Jesus was crucified (Luke 22:6-7). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 21, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Doubt, Unbelief—What’s the Difference?

doubt-factor

from Google Images

As we walk through these studies in Luke, we need to understand the difference between the attitudes of John the Baptist, Simon the Pharisee and the sect of the Pharisees and the Jewish authorities. Jesus warned of the blessings that were meant to go to the Jews but would ultimately go to the gentiles, if the Jews wouldn’t repent and receive the Gospel Jesus preached (cf. Luke 4:24-27). History reveals that the Jews, as a whole, didn’t believe Jesus, so the Gospel eventually went out to the gentiles, and they were granted the privilege of preaching the word of God to the world throughout this age, something up to the 1st century AD had been granted only to the Jews. Yet, one has to wonder about at least some believers. John the Baptist (Luke 7:18-23) and Simon the apostle of Jesus (Luke 7:36-50) show they doubted Jesus was the Messiah. Why were they excused, but the Pharisees and the Jewish lawyers punished? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 1, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

No Greater Prophet

none-greater-than-john-1

from Google Images

After John’s disciples left to return to John with a message from Jesus (Luke 7:24), Jesus turned to the people who remained. They seemed to have been aware of the fact that John questioned the direction of Jesus’ ministry, and it seemed obvious that he had expressed some displeasure in what Jesus was and was not doing. Some of those people may have been offended with John’s request, but Jesus was not. Therefore, Jesus turned to the people and asked them why they went out of the cities in order to hear John. What did they expect to find? They could not have expected to find someone tossed by the wind (Luke 7:24), because John wasn’t fickle with words. That is, people couldn’t take John’s words to mean anything they interpreted them to mean (cf. 1Corinthians 1:17). They knew John wasn’t double-minded. They knew he wasn’t tossed and carried away by every wind of doctrine (James 1:6-8). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 20, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

How John Handled His Doubts

Faith Erases Doubt

from Google Images

Immediately after Jesus raised up the dead son of the widow of Nain, the people began spreading the news throughout all the regions of Galilee and into Judea that a great Prophet had arisen among them. The sense of this remark is that they referred to the Prophet whom Moses predicted would come (Deuteronomy 18:15). This Prophet would be similar to Moses in that he would show the Jews how they must behave. He would be a Second Moses; the Targum Jonathan calls him the Second Deliverer at Deuteronomy 18:15. His coming implied Moses (i.e. the Law) was not enough. Either changes had to be made or a deeper meaning had to be revealed. Moreover, if anyone didn’t listen and obey this Deliverer, God, himself, would call that person into account (Deuteronomy 18:18-19). What is interesting at this point is who began to doubt Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 18, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The Context of the Centurion’s Request

synagogue

from Google Images

One may ask why the centurion would want or need the Jewish elders (Luke 7:3) to speak for him. Ordinarily, the Romans were viewed with contempt by the Jewish people. They were their conquerors who continually oppressed them. There is no reason to think that the centurion should believe Jesus would treat him or his request with kindness. Therefore, he needed friends of Jesus who would act on the centurion’s behalf and make his request known in the matter of his dying servant. But, what about the father of the dying young man? If Luke 7:2-10 reflects the same event as John 4:45-54, why couldn’t the young man’s father simply make the request of Jesus and expect Jesus to respond favorably? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 6, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,