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Tag Archives: Grace

Our Participation in Divine Nature

divine-nature-2

from Google Images

In Philippians 2:12 Paul tells his readers to each work out his own salvation with fear and trembling. In Peter’s second epistle Peter points to the believer’s part in his own salvation, showing that he has become a partner in or a partaker of divine nature. While God saves mankind from death (Romans 6:23) and gives us eternal life (2Corinthians 5:1-4), those who claim Jesus as their Savior are expected in this present life to in share the cost of salvation. Paul refers to this as offering oneself as a living sacrifice to God. In doing so, we refuse to be conformed to the image of this world by submitting to God’s hand in forming us after the image of his Son (Romans 8:29; 12:1-2; 2Corinthians 3:18). Peter describes the believer’s part as taking place in the knowledge of Jesus Christ, or as we might put it today: in asking ourselves WWJD? Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on February 27, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Christ’s Divine Power

christ-in-you

from Google Images

Peter claims the believer has been given all things pertaining to life and godliness through “divine power” (2Peter 1:3), but is Peter referring to the Father’s power or that of Jesus? In 1Peter 1:1 Peter writes “…our God and Savior, Jesus Christ.” Then in verse-2 he again refers to Jesus with “…the knowledge of God, even Jesus our Lord.” The natural implication of the word divine in 1Peter 1:3 points to Jesus, i.e. Jesus’ divine power. It seems out of place, if Peter intends for us to understand the Father, because up to this point he is writing only of Jesus—our God and Savior and our knowledge of him. Why insert divine in reference to God (the Father)? It wasn’t worshipers of God who were being attacked, but worshipers of Jesus. Knowing Jesus as God was an astonishing revelation in the first century, and the mention of divine in verse-3 compliments Peter’s mention of our God and Savior in the first two verses of his epistle. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2017 in Epistles of Peter, Gospel of Luke

 

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The Woman with the Issue of Blood

tassels

from Google Images

While he was on his way to heal a young girl, a woman who had in issue of blood for twelve years (Luke 8:43; Mark 5:27-28) came up behind Jesus and touched him, hoping to go undetected. She believed that by touching Jesus she would be healed, and she thought that going to him among the thronging crowd her presence and purpose would go unnoticed. She was immediately healed, and her bleeding stopped (Luke 8:44). Mark 5:29 says that the woman felt in her body that she was healed of that plague. What she did was reach out and touch one of the four fringes or tassels, which hung from Jesus’ outer garment (Luke 8:44; cf. Numbers 15:38-39; Matthew 23:5). They were there to remind devout Jews of the Lord’s commandments and one’s duty to obey them. It had a set apart or holy significance (Numbers 15:40) that the woman reached out to touch, hoping to be made whole. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 2, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Freedom to Be Gracious

suffering-servant

from Google Images

It is a gracious matter to endure suffering, while acting out of one’s desire to be obedient to God (1Peter 2:19), or to behave in a manner pleasing to him. Often, this suffering comes at the hand of others. When Peter addresses the plight of the servant in 1Peter 2:18-20, application can be made to other walks of life, for example one is able to act out Peter’s argument at one’s place of employment. Yet, it needs to be remembered that the primary application is to the one who has no freedom, like slaves and conquered peoples. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 16, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Jesus and Moses

from Google Images

from Google Images

In Luke 5:33-39 Luke records Jesus making four pairs of contrasts: fasting and feasting, an old garment and new cloth, old wineskins and new wine, and old and new wine. All have to do with religious practice and how Jesus disciples relate to God, versus how this was done under the Old Covenant. Some contrast the Church and Judaism, but this isn’t enough. The heart of the matter is not simply Jewish tradition. Rather, the problem is with the Mosaic Law. Moses and Jesus are at odds in this respect, namely, that law and grace simply have no common ground. One cannot cry out for justice and forgive at the same time. Nevertheless, Jesus did not come to destroy the Law but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17)—i.e. to complete it, furnish what it lacked and pay its demands. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 30, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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This Day this Scripture is Fulfilled

Spirit of the Lord is upon me -1

from Google Images

It is interesting that Matthew punctuates his entire Gospel with the theme of Christ fulfilling all things under the Old Covenant. Luke doesn’t do that. Rather, except for a few statements in the final week of Jesus’ public ministry, Luke brackets the whole of Jesus’ words and deeds between Luke 4:19 and 24:44 under the theme of what in Scripture was to be fulfilled. Here in Luke 4:19 Jesus claimed he was the Messiah by saying Isaiah 61 was fulfilled in the ears of his family and friends at Nazareth. Then in Luke 24:44 Jesus told his disciples in the upper room that all things in the Law, Prophets and Writings (Psalms) that were written about him had to have been fulfilled by him. Luke sets forth these two Scriptures as an inclusio.[1] That is, everything that falls between these two verses, he intends for us (and his addressee, Theophilus – Luke 1:3) to understand they concern Jesus fulfilling the Scriptures. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 11, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Birth of John the Baptist

John the Baptist - Birth

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John the Baptist was one of the seven people God named before they were born.[1] He was six months older than Jesus, because Elizabeth was pregnant with him in her sixth month when Mary conceived. John would later be killed by Herod Antipas, ruler of Galilee, because John had been critical of him for marrying Herodias, his brother’s (Herod Philip’s) wife. Jesus said there was no greater prophet than John the Baptist, yet only Luke mentions the details surrounding his birth. Josephus tells us that about eight years after John’s death: Antipas was at war with King Aretas, his former father-in-law, whose daughter Herod had divorced in order to marry Herodias. Antipas lost that war taking heavy casualties and losing his authority and presence in key areas where his land bordered that of King Aretas. The Jewish people were convinced Herod’s defeat was punishment from God for killing John the Baptist. What can we know of John? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 3, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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