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Tag Archives: Josephus

The Sanhedrin

Sanhedrin

from Google Images

In Luke 20:1-2 Jesus gets a visit from members of the Sanhedrin. There were many sanhedrins throughout Judea and Galilee. They were the local courts of the land, composed of three or twenty-three members,[1] populated by the Jewish leaders in each town. The chief court in Jerusalem, THE Sanhedrin, or the Supreme Court of the Jews, seems to have been composed of the three, twenty-three member courts at Jerusalem.[2] It was made up of Pharisees, Sadducees and Jewish elders (considered to be the Jewish nobility). The high priest would preside over the assembly as its president or nasi, i.e. prince (cf. cf. Numbers 11:16; ).[3] Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted by on April 10, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Profiteering Inside the Temple

Cleansing the Temple - 1

from Google Images

Jewish tradition tells us that the money-changers (Matthew 22:17-21) were licensed by the high priests, the authorities at Jerusalem. Without any doubt, Annas and his family figured prominently among them, and most of the high priests profited very well for the business conducted by the money-changers and those who sold animals for sacrifice inside the Temple compound. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 8, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Crucifixion that Almost Was

Crucifixion - 2

from Google Images

I wonder if Jesus could have been crucified one year earlier than when that event actually took place, which, according to my understanding, took place in 31 AD. Could God have permitted the event to occur one year earlier, and would this have made a difference afterward, as far as the preaching of the Gospel was concerned? The fact is, that Jesus does seem to indicate that the crucifixion could have occurred one year prior to when it actually took place. Nevertheless, it was delayed because Jesus prayed to his Father. I was surprised to see this possible eventuality and almost missed it. Would it have changed anything, if Jesus was crucified at another time? Perhaps matters such as this can never be known with certainty, but it is encouraging to understand that Jesus prays for us, and our heavenly Father listens to Jesus and always answers his prayers (John 11:41; cf. 1John 5:15). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 24, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Lusts of Men

disciple-of-jesus

from Google Images

Many commentaries on the first epistle of Peter would have us believe that he wrote specifically to gentiles, but I don’t believe this can be adequately supported in Scripture. The word of God tells us that Peter’s specific mission was to Jews (believing and unbelieving), not gentiles. The fact that he was chosen to go to Cornelius in Acts 10 is an anomaly, which had its purpose in getting fundamental Jewish believers to accept the idea that God really does receive gentiles as he does the Jews (cf. Acts 11:1-4, 17-18). In the context of Peter’s first epistle, it is understood in the term Hellenist that Jews, identified as such (cf. John 12:20-21), had made compromises with gentile behavior in order to appear more like them and less like the fundamentalist Jews of Jerusalem. These Hellenist Jews of the Diaspora had made concessions against Judaism, which resulted in acts of: lasciviousness, lust, drunkenness, reveling, banqueting, and abominable idolatries. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 11, 2017 in Epistles of Peter

 

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The Gospel and Household Affairs

haustafel-codes

from Google Images

In chapter three Peter continues in the haustafel or household codes of his day. Household rules throughout the Empire were already in use by both Jews and gentiles. They were similar in content and where they would oppose the believer’s worldview,[1] Peter (like Paul) Christianized these lists by making some changes or adding to their wording. They were in place for the social wellbeing of the state and were meant to keep everything in its place for a well ordered life and common good. Although in Christ there are no distinctions (neither bond nor free, male nor female etc.), this was not so in society. The Gospel, as I have concluded in previous blog-posts, is not interested in changing society at large. Jesus is not the enemy of the state, nor does he seek to change the affairs of the state (John 18:36). The Gospel speaks to the hearts of people and changes their behavior. People who have been changed eventually seek to change the customs of the world, particularly that part of the world in which they live. Social change does not come through rebellion, but through concession. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 19, 2016 in Epistles of Peter

 

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Jesus and Demons

from Google Images

from Google Images

The words Jesus spoke in Capernaum (Luke 4:31-34) must have been similar to what he claimed in Nazareth. In Nazareth Jesus used Scripture to say he was the Messiah, and there the community rose up against him. However, in Capernaum it was a demoniac that rose up against Jesus. One has to wonder if the demoniac in Capernaum tried to do something similar to Jesus that the whole community at Nazareth intended on doing. In other words, the demoniac, at least at first, may have been considered to be in his right mind by the community of Capernaum, because demoniacs, as a rule, are not permitted in the synagogue.[1] The man may even have been a well respected and feared leader in the synagogue. In this context he may have risen up in the assembly to challenge Jesus, saying that his claim to be the Messiah would end in the Romans destroying the nation (cf. Mark 1:24 and John 11:48), or at least the city from which Jesus began gathering a following. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 25, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus Spoke with Authority

from Google Images

from Google Images

Luke tells us that, after Jesus left Nazareth, he came to Capernaum and taught there on the Sabbaths (Luke 4:31), and on one Sabbath he was challenged by a man having an unclean spirit (Luke 4:33-34). Whatever one may think of unclean spirits, e.g. demons[1], spirits of the wicked dead[2] or a fractured human spirit that is bent on destroying self or others, the New Testament reveals that Jesus and his disciples had authority over them. It makes no difference what they really are; the point in the New Testament is their power over men is undone by the authority of Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2016 in Gospel of Luke

 

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