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Tag Archives: Messiah

Jesus Third Passover

Rejected Messiah

from Google Images

It is important for us to realize that Jesus at this time is not traveling to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51) in order to die there, as so many Bible commentaries suppose.[1] Rather, Jesus set his face as a flint to go to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51) in order to confront the religious authorities about his office as Messiah, and this happened to be the time of his third Passover of his public ministry. The Galilean Jewish authorities had already rejected Jesus as their Messiah (Luke 6:11; cf. Matthew 12:14, 23-24; Mark 3:22), and considered his claim to be demonic, or, put another way, evidence of insanity (Mark 3:21; cf. John 10:20). Nevertheless, Jerusalem hadn’t the opportunity to officially reject him, although they hadn’t shown any signs of receiving him as their Messiah up to this visit, either. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 8, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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“The Only Good Prophet Is a Dead Prophet”

Prophets

from Google Images

Jesus’ offering himself as the Jews’ Messiah at Jerusalem was rejected by the authorities there (cf. Luke 11:15-16), which consisted of both Pharisees and lawyers. The lawyers were rabbis (scribes) or experts in the law and could belong to either the sect of the Pharisees or that of the Sadducees. Normally, the two sects got along for purposes of governing the people, but they did have a mutual dislike for each other. The lawyer who spoke out in defense of the Pharisees (Luke 11:45), may, indeed, have been a Pharisee, but Jesus responded by pronouncing three woes upon the whole group of lawyers (Luke 11:46-52). So, this would have united both the Pharisees and the Sadducees against a common enemy. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on August 3, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Public Insults and a Private Rebuke

While Jesus was still speaking to the crowd, he was invited for a meal at the home of one of the Pharisees (Luke 11:37). One has to wonder if the Jewish authorities wanted to get Jesus away from the crowd of pilgrims that kept getting larger and larger (Luke 11:14, 29). Jesus was invited to “dine” aristao (G709) at the Pharisee’s home. This was not the evening or chief meal of the day, because Luke later makes a distinction between the two in Luke 14:12. There the ariston (G712) is mentioned with the chief meal of the day, or the supper—deipnon (G1173). John uses the word aristao (G709) to describe the meal Jesus made for the disciples after they labored all night fishing (John 21:12, 15), so it would appear that Jesus was invited to eat a breakfast with the Pharisee immediately following the hour of prayer at the Temple. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 20, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Parable of the Evil Spirit

Butterflies

from Google Images

In Luke 11:24-28 Jesus offers his listeners a parable about an evil spirit in an effort to unveil what was at stake for the Jewish nation, if they didn’t receive him as their Messiah. First of all, there isn’t a single example in the Bible where a demoniac was healed but, afterward, became possessed again. Therefore, we need to ask if Jesus’ words have another meaning. Secondly, we need to remember that Jews in the first century thought and spoke differently than did gentiles of the same period. Jews would think and speak in pictures, but gentiles more analytically. For example, a gentile might have claimed Caesar was a great leader, but the Jews would have called David a great shepherd. A gentile might refer to a good man as someone of strong moral character, but an ancient Jew might say he was as a tree planted by the riverside, whose leaves didn’t wither (cf. Psalm 1:3). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 6, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus’ Three Arguments

Casting out demons

from Google Images

When his enemies had accused him of being in league with the Devil, because he was able to do the impossible, Jesus exposes the feebleness of their accusation by presenting three arguments, by offering his adversaries three possible scenarios. The first is an illogical argument on their part that Jesus used demonic power to advance his goals. Jesus second argument left his antagonists without an argument to support their own activities in the realm of spiritual warfare. Finally, Jesus showed in the parable of the Strong Man that Jesus was stronger than Satan, and was dismantling his kingdom, showing that Jesus was the Messiah. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 4, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Who Were Jesus’ Accusers?

Accusers

from Google Images

For about two and one half years Jesus had been publicly presenting himself as the Jews’ Messiah. While he never said in so many words, “I am the long awaited Messiah!” He did read a Messianic passage of Scripture in Nazareth, and immediately afterward say: “This day, is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears (Luke 4:21). He was rejected in Nazareth, but he operated afterward out of Capernaum and performed many miracles there, but the authorities in Galilee challenged his doctrine and even plotted how they might get rid of him (Luke 6:11; cf. Matthew 12:14; Mark 3:6). So, in Luke 9:51 Jesus set his face like a flint to ascend to Jerusalem and present himself as the Messiah there. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Judgment Day

AD 70

from Google Images

In Luke 10:12 Jesus spoke of the day in which the Jews would be judged, and according to what he would later tell Annas, the high priest, in the final week of his public ministry (cf. Matthew 26:64), Jesus would be their Judge! In other words, Jesus spoke of the coming war of the Jews with Rome that would culminate in the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, and such a thing would be the loss of the Jews’ national status. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 2, 2017 in Gospel of Luke

 

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